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Add data to a project

Tutorial summary

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  • Video length: 1:32
  • This video was created with ArcGIS Pro 2.0.

With ArcGIS Pro, you can create maps and scenes by adding data from your own computer, from a local network, or from a project or map package. You can also add data from your ArcGIS Online or ArcGIS Enterprise portal, or another portal such as the Living Atlas of the World. In this tutorial, you will add data from Living Atlas, from your project geodatabase, and from a folder connection.

  • Estimated time: 30 minutes
  • Software requirements:
    • ArcGIS Pro
    • ArcGIS Online or ArcGIS Enterprise portal connection
Note:

The tutorial steps in the online help reflect the look and capabilities of the current software release. If you have an earlier software version, use the offline help system to open the tutorial. To switch from the online to the offline help system, see About ArcGIS Pro Help. If you don't have ArcGIS Pro or ArcGIS Online, you can sign up for an ArcGIS free trial .

Open the project

You will assess the impact of potential flooding in Wellington, New Zealand, using a 2D map and a 3D scene. Your data will include hillshade and slope layers to show relief, neighborhood boundaries and buildings, and a layer showing the area susceptible to flooding in an extreme weather event.

  1. Start ArcGIS Pro and sign in if necessary.
  2. On the start page, under your recent projects, click Open another project.
    Note:

    If you already have a project open, click the Project tab on the ribbon. In the list of tabs on the left, click Open.

  3. On the Open project page, click Portal and click Browse Browse.
  4. On the Open Project dialog box, under Portal Portal, click All Portal All Portal.
  5. At the top of the dialog box, in the Search box, type Add data to a project tutorial and press Enter.
  6. In the list of search results, click Add data to a project to select the project package.
    Note:

    If there is more than one project package with this name, make sure to select the correct one. In the upper right corner of the Open Project dialog box, click the Show/hide details panel button Show/hide details panel. The owner should be ArcGISProTutorials.

  7. Click OK.

    The project opens with a map centered on Wellington, New Zealand. The project also contains a local 3D scene.

    Map of Wellington, New Zealand

    The project is stored in your <user documents>\ArcGIS\Packages folder.

Add data from the Living Atlas of the World

The basemap layer in the Wellington map is the World Ocean basemap. It shows topographic relief for land areas, but at a generalized level. A relief layer with higher resolution would make it easier to see the impact of potential flooding. In addition, a more detailed layer of place names would add context to the local geography. You can find map layers to meet these needs in the Living Atlas of the World, a curated collection of global geographic information. Maps and layers from the Living Atlas can be added directly to ArcGIS Pro.

Note:

To access the Living Atlas, you must be signed in to ArcGIS Pro through an ArcGIS Online portal. The name of your portal appears in the upper right corner of the ArcGIS Pro window. If you are signed in through an ArcGIS Enterprise portal, you will be able to access the Living Atlas only if your administrator has enabled access. For more information, see Manage portal connections from ArcGIS Pro in the ArcGIS Pro help and Configure Living Atlas content in the ArcGIS Enterprise help.

  1. At the top of the Catalog pane, click the Portal tab.
    Tip:

    If necessary, you can open the Catalog pane Catalog Pane and the Contents pane Contents from the View tab on the ribbon.

    Under the Portal tab are four tabs from which you can add data:

    • My Content My Content—Maps, layers, and other items you have added to your ArcGIS Online or ArcGIS Enterprise portal
    • Groups Groups—Items shared with groups of which you are a member
    • All Portal All Portal—Items shared publicly on ArcGIS Online as well as items shared exclusively to your portal
    • Living Atlas Living Atlas—Curated items shared through the Living Atlas of the World

  2. Click the Living Atlas tab Living Atlas.
  3. Click the Categories drop-down menu and browse to Landscape > Elevation.
    Living Atlas categories menu

    In the Catalog pane, the list of Living Atlas items is filtered to show maps and layers related to elevation.

  4. In the list of items, hover over the World Hillshade tile layer Tiled layer.
    ScreenTip for World Hillshade tile layer

    A ScreenTip displays a thumbnail image of the layer and other metadata.

  5. In the list of items, right-click the World Hillshade tile layer Tiled layer and click Add To Current Map Add To Current Map.
    World Hillshade layer

    By default, the map zooms to the extent of the new layer, which covers the whole world. However, the extent is constrained by the local New Zealand map projection that has been set for the map.

    Tip:

    If you don't see the World Hillshade tile layer, type world hillshade in the search box. Make sure to add the World Hillshade tile layer Tiled layer, not the World Hillshade map Map.

  6. On the ribbon, click the Map tab if necessary. In the Navigate group, click the Previous Extent button Previous Extent to return to Wellington.
  7. In the Contents pane, drag the World Hillshade layer beneath the World Ocean Base layer.

    Partial transparency has been applied to the World Ocean Base layer, so the World Hillshade layer shows through it. You can turn the World Hillshade layer off and on in the Contents pane to see the difference in terrain detail.

  8. In the Catalog pane, click the Categories drop-down menu again and browse to Boundaries & Places > Places.
  9. In the filtered list of items, right-click the World Boundaries and Places Alternate tile layer Tiled layer (not the World Boundaries and Places layer), and click Add To Current Map Add To Current Map.

    You don't immediately see the place names on the map because the layer has a default visibility range setting.

  10. In the Contents pane, confirm that the World_Boundaries_and_Places_Alternate layer is selected (highlighted in blue).
  11. On the ribbon, under Layer, click the Appearance tab.

    The layer does not display at map scales larger (closer) than 1:144,448. Your current map scale is shown in the lower-left corner of the map view.

  12. On the Appearance tab, in the Visibility Range group, click the drop-down menu next to In Beyond Maximum Scale and click 1:24,000.
    Tip:

    If you don't have this value in your drop-down list, you can type it directly into the input box.

    The place names appear on the map.

  13. In the Effects group, change the Layer Transparency Transparency to 25% and press Enter.
    Tip:

    Alternatively, use the slider to set the transparency.

  14. In the Contents pane, right-click the World Ocean Reference layer and click Remove Remove.

    Now you have just one layer of place names in the map.

  15. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button Save to save the project.

Add data from a geodatabase

Every ArcGIS Pro project has a project geodatabase, which is the default location for storing your project's spatial data. You'll browse to the project geodatabase and add data to the Wellington map.

  1. In the Catalog pane, click the Project tab. Browse to Databases > Add_data_to_a_project.gdb.

    The project geodatabase contains two feature classes: Buildings and Suburbs. It also contains a raster dataset named slope. You'll add the Suburbs data now.

  2. Right-click Suburbs and click Add To Current Map Add To Current Map.
    Tip:

    You can also drag and drop the layer from the Catalog pane.

  3. In the Contents pane, drag the Suburbs layer beneath the World_Boundaries_and_Places_Alternate layer.
  4. Right-click the Suburbs layer and click Zoom To Layer Zoom To Layer to center the layer in the map.

    The Suburbs layer has a solid fill color that prevents you from seeing the basemap under it. You'll change the symbol fill color and outline.

  5. In the Contents pane, click the symbol patch under the Suburbs layer to open the Symbology pane.
  6. In the Symbology pane, under Format Polygon Symbol, click the Properties tab.
  7. On the Symbol tab Symbol, under Appearance, change the Color to No Color.
  8. Change the Outline color to Black. Change the Outline width to 1 pt and press Enter. Click Apply at the bottom of the pane.
    Map of suburb boundaries
    Tip:

    To learn more about symbology, try the Symbolize map layers quick-start tutorial.

Add data from a folder

An ArcGIS Pro project may contain resources that aren't stored within the project geodatabase. For example, this project includes a shapefile representing the flood risk zone for Wellington. A shapefile, like a geodatabase, is a spatial data format for storing feature classes.

Typically, when you access data from a location on your computer or a local network, you connect to a folder. However, in this case, the shapefile is part of the project package and the folder connection already exists.

  1. In the Catalog pane, browse to Folders > Add_data_to_a_project_1 > commondata > userdata.
    The folder structure of the project in the Catalog pane

    The userdata folder contains a shapefile named Flood_Zone_Wellington.shp.

    Note:

    In a project package, files that can't be stored in a geodatabase, such as shapefiles, CSV files, and text files, are included as attachments. Within the project package folder structure, attachments are stored in the commondata > userdata folder.

  2. Right-click Flood_Zone_Wellington.shp and click Add To Current Map Add To Current Map.
  3. In the Contents pane, drag the Flood_Zone_Wellington layer beneath the Suburbs layer.
  4. Click the symbol patch under the Flood_Zone_Wellington layer.
  5. In the Symbology pane, under Format Polygon Symbol, click the Properties tab if necessary.
  6. On the Symbol tab Symbol, under Appearance, change the Color to Big Sky Blue.
    Color palette
  7. Change the Outline width to 0 pt and press Enter. Click Apply.

    The map shows that most of the flood risk zone lies within one suburb.

    Map of suburb boundaries and flood risk zone
  8. On the map, click the suburb containing most of the flood risk zone.

    A pop-up identifies the suburb as Te Aro.

  9. Close the pop-up.
  10. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button Save.

Visualize your data in 3D

You'll look at the data in a 3D scene to visualize the potential impact of flooding in the Te Aro suburb. The 3D scene in the project already contains a topographic basemap and a layer of buildings. You'll copy and paste the flood zone layer from the map. You'll also add a slope dataset from the project geodatabase.

  1. In the Contents pane, right-click the Flood_Zone_Wellington layer and click Copy Copy.
  2. Click the Wellington 3D view tab to make the scene active.
    Wellington 3D view tab
  3. In the Contents pane, under Drawing Order, right-click Wellington 3D 3D Scene View and click Paste Paste.

    The layer is added to the scene. You'll add the slope data to get a better sense of how water flows and accumulates in the flood risk zone.

  4. In the Catalog pane, browse if necessary, to Databases > Add_data_to_a_project.gdb. Click the slope raster dataset to select it.
  5. Drag and drop the slope dataset onto the scene.

    The default symbology for the slope layer is a black-to-white color scheme. You'll change it to a conventional color scheme for slope.

  6. In the Contents pane, click the symbol patch (the black-to-white color scheme) under the slope layer.
  7. In the Symbology pane, click the Color scheme drop-down menu. At the bottom of the drop-down list, select the Show names check box.

    The color schemes are ordered alphabetically. Names appear above their associated color schemes.

  8. Scroll down and click the Slope color scheme (bright green to bright red).

    The symbology is applied to the layer.

    The project contains two bookmarks to help you explore the potential flood zone in the Te Aro suburb.

  9. On the ribbon, click the Map tab if necessary. In the Navigate group, click Bookmarks Bookmarks. Under Wellington 3D Bookmarks, click Flood View 1.
    Buildings and flood zone in Te Aro suburb

    The scene zooms to the bookmark. In the lower-left corner of the view, the on-screen navigator shows that your view is facing south-southeast. It looks like a flood would affect most of the buildings in the foreground of the view.

  10. Click Bookmarks Bookmarks again and click Flood View 2.

    This view shows how flood water may flow through the landscape at the eastern end of the suburb. Use the Explore tool Explore Tool on the Map tab or the on-screen navigator Navigator to continue exploring the suburb. You may want to create new bookmarks New Bookmark at locations where flooding may cause additional damage.

  11. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button Save.
  12. Close any open panes other than the Contents and Catalog panes.

For many projects, you will need to search for relevant data to complete your mapping and analysis. In addition to the Living Atlas of the World, you can use the All Portal tab All Portal in the Catalog pane to search for maps and layers shared to ArcGIS Online. You can also use ArcGIS Open Data to find open-access data from thousands of organizations that share their authoritative data.

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