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Tutorial summary

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  • Video length: 1:58
  • This video was created with ArcGIS Pro 2.0.

Spatial data and attribute data are complementary. Spatial data represents locations and attribute data describes what is known about those locations. In this tutorial, you will explore several ways of working with attribute data. You'll get attribute values from pop-ups and panes. You'll format a table to show fields of interest. You'll query and summarize your data. Finally, you'll create a chart to represent attribute data visually.

  • Estimated time: 45 minutes
  • Software requirements: ArcGIS Pro
Note:

The tutorial steps in the online help reflect the look and capabilities of the current software release. If you have an earlier software version, use the offline help system to open the tutorial. To switch from the online to the offline help system, see About ArcGIS Pro Help. If you don't have ArcGIS Pro or ArcGIS Online, you can sign up for an ArcGIS free trial .

Open the project

Livestock farming is a historic staple of the New Zealand economy. Sheep, cattle, deer, and pigs have all been farmed on both the North and South Islands. Today, agriculture accounts for about 4 percent of the country's total GDP. While sheep are still raised for meat and wool, dairy farming is now the most important part of the agricultural sector. In this tutorial, you'll explore information about sheep and other livestock at the New Zealand regional level.

  1. Start ArcGIS Pro and sign in if necessary.
  2. On the start page, under your recent projects, click Open another project.
    Note:

    If you already have a project open, click the Project tab on the ribbon. In the list of tabs on the left, click Open.

  3. On the Open project page, click Portal and click Browse Browse.
  4. On the Open Project dialog box, under Portal Portal, click All Portal All Portal.
  5. At the top of the dialog box, in the Search box, type Explore your data tutorial and press Enter.
  6. In the list of search results, click Explore your data to select the project package.
    Note:

    If there is more than one project package with this name, make sure to select the correct one. In the upper right corner of the Open Project dialog box, click the Show/hide details panel button Show/hide details panel. The owner should be ArcGISProTutorials.

  7. Click OK.

    The project opens with a map of New Zealand's 16 regions against a light gray basemap. The regions are labeled with their names.

    Regional map of New Zealand

    The project is stored in your <user documents>\ArcGIS\Packages folder.

Explore regions and their attributes

Each region has information about the numbers of sheep and cattle found there. You can access this information in different ways: through pop-ups on the map, through the layer attribute table, and through the Attributes pane.

  1. On the ribbon, on the Map tab, in the Navigate group, make sure that the Explore tool Explore Tool is selected.
  2. On the map, click a region, such as Canterbury on the South Island.
    Pop-up window for Canterbury region

    A pop-up window opens with attributes for the region. They include the region name, its area, and livestock counts for different years. These attributes are stored in a table associated with the Regions layer.

  3. Scroll down in the pop-up window, or resize the window, to see all the attributes.

    At the bottom is an attribute called IMAGE_URL with a link to an online image. Later in the tutorial, you'll format these attributes to make them easier to read. You'll also configure the pop-ups to display the images referenced by the IMAGE_URL attribute.

  4. Click another region on the map.

    The pop-up window updates with the attributes for the region you clicked.

    Tip:

    To keep multiple pop-ups open, click the Pin to screen button Pin to screen on the pop-up title bar.

  5. Close any open pop-up windows. In the Contents pane, click the Regions layer to select it.

    On the ribbon, the Feature Layer contextual tab appears. It has three tabs for working with the selected layer.

  6. Under Feature Layer, click the Data tab. In the Table group, click Attribute Table Open Table.
    Regions layer attribute table

    The Regions table opens. Each row, or record, in the table represents a region on the map. Each column, or field, represents an attribute.

  7. In the Regions table, click any gray square at the left edge of a row to select a record.

    The record is highlighted in the table and the corresponding region is selected on the map.

    Tip:

    If you can't see the whole map when the table is open, try maximizing the ArcGIS Pro window, zooming out on the map, or undocking the map view.

  8. In the row of tools at the top of the table, click Clear Clear Selection to deselect the record and the feature on the map.
  9. On the ribbon, click the Map tab. In the Selection group, click the Select drop-down menu and click Rectangle Select By Rectangle.
  10. On the map, draw a box over a few features to select them. It doesn't matter which features or how many.

    In the table, the corresponding records are selected.

  11. Make the Regions table active by clicking its view tab.
  12. At the bottom of the table view, click the Show selected records button Show Selected Records to see only the selected records.
  13. Click the Show all records button Show All Records to display all the records again.
  14. On the ribbon, on the Map tab, in the Selection group, click Attributes Attributes.

    The Attributes pane opens. In the Attributes pane, you can view and edit attribute values for selected features. The currently selected features are listed at the top of the pane.

  15. One-by-one, click the regions listed at the top of the Attributes pane.

    The region you click flashes on the map, and its attributes are shown at the bottom of the pane.

  16. Press the Ctrl key and click a second region at the top of the Attributes pane.
    Attributes pane

    The Attributes pane compares the values of the two selected regions. In this case, the two regions have different values for all of their attributes. If they shared an attribute value—for example, the same number of sheep in 2014—that value would be displayed instead of the (Different Values) text.

  17. Close the Attributes pane.
  18. On the ribbon, on the Map tab, in the Selection group, click Clear Clear to deselect the map features and table records.

    The attribute table has shown you the types of information you have for the Regions layer. Now you can begin to ask specific questions. For example, you can ask which region in New Zealand has the most sheep.

  19. In the attribute table, locate the SHEEP_2014 field. Right-click its field heading and click Sort Descending Sort Descending.

    The region with the most sheep is Manawatu-Wanganui with 5,328,843. Otago is close behind with 5,257,716 sheep.

Design fields

You'll turn off visibility for some fields that you're not going to look at. You'll also change field aliases, which are more natural, descriptive substitutes for field names. Aliases can include spaces and other special characters that are not allowed in field names. Finally, you'll apply formatting to numeric fields to make the numbers easier to read.

  1. If necessary, in the Contents pane, click the Regions layer to select it.
  2. On the ribbon, under Feature Layer, click the Data tab. In the Design group, click Fields Fields.
    Fields view of the Regions table

    The Fields: Regions view opens to let you work with field properties of the Regions table.

  3. In the Visible column, clear the check box in the field heading to turn off visibility for all fields in the table.
  4. Scroll down through the fields view. In the Visible column, select the check boxes for the following fields to make them visible:
    • REGION_NAME
    • AREA_SQ_KM
    • SHEEP_2014
    • BEEF_CATTLE_2014
    • DAIRY_CATTLE_2014

    The fields that are not visible will not display in the attribute table and will not be available for table operations. However, you can make these fields visible at any time.

  5. In the Alias column, double-click the REGION_NAME alias to make it editable. Replace it with Name and press Enter.
    Caution:

    Be sure to change the alias—which is the display name for the field—and not the field name itself. Both are editable.

  6. Double-click the AREA_SQ_KM alias to make it editable. Replace it with Area in Square Km and press Enter.
  7. Change the following aliases as shown:
    • SHEEP_2014 to Sheep 2014
    • BEEF_CATTLE_2014 to Beef Cattle 2014
    • DAIRY_CATTLE_2014 to Dairy Cattle 2014
  8. In the Number Format column, double-click in the cell for the AREA_SQ_KM field. In the cell, click the Determine display formatting for numeric field types button.
    Determine display formatting for numeric field types button
  9. On the Number Format dialog box, change Decimal places to 0 and select the Show thousands separators check box. Click OK.

    This formatting will make the numbers easier to read.

  10. In the Number Format column, double-click in the cell for the SHEEP_2014 field. In the cell, click the Determine display formatting for numeric field types button.
  11. On the Number Format dialog box, select the Show thousands separators check box. Click OK.
  12. Change the number format for the following fields to show thousands separators:
    • BEEF_CATTLE_2014
    • DAIRY_CATTLE_2014
  13. On the ribbon, click the Fields tab if necessary. In the Changes group, click Save Save.
  14. Close the Fields: Regions view.
  15. If necessary, click the Refresh table button Refresh table in the lower-right corner of the table view.

    In the Regions table, your changes have been applied. Only five fields are visible. The field headings show your aliases, and the numeric fields have thousands separators.

  16. In the Regions table, right-click any gray square at the left edge of a row and click Pop-up Pop-up.
    Pop-up for Otago region

    Your field design changes are reflected in the pop-up. However, the changes have been saved only to the current ArcGIS Pro session. To make them permanent, you need to save the project.

  17. Close the pop-up.
  18. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save Save.

Query the table

Suppose you want to know which regions are major producers of both sheep and beef cattle. You can find out with an attribute query. An attribute query finds records in the table that meet a condition or set of conditions.

  1. On the ribbon, click the Map tab. In the Selection group, click Select By Attributes Select By Attributes.

    The Geoprocessing pane opens to the Select Layer By Attribute tool. The Layer Name or Table View is correctly set to Regions. The Selection type is correctly set to New selection.

  2. Click Add Clause to start your query expression.

    The clause builder opens.

  3. In the clause builder, under Field, choose Sheep 2014. For the query condition, choose is Greater Than or Equal to. Make sure the Values button is selected. For the value, type 1000000 (1 million).
    Clause to find regions with 1 million or more sheep

    This clause will select regions that have 1 million or more sheep.

  4. Click Add to add the clause to the expression.
  5. Click Add Clause to start building a second clause.
  6. In the clause builder, under Field, choose Beef Cattle 2014. For the query condition, choose is Greater Than or Equal to. For the value, type 500000 (five hundred thousand).
    Clause to find regions with five hundred thousand or more beef cattle

    A logical operator has been added automatically to connect the two clauses. It defaults to And, which is correct in this case. Both clauses must be true for a region to be selected.

  7. Click Add to add the clause to the expression.
  8. Under the expression, click the Verify the SQL expression is valid button Verify the SQL expression is valid.

    The message The SQL expression is valid appears under your expression.

  9. At the bottom of the Geoprocessing pane, click Run Run.

    At the bottom of the pane, a green check mark appears next to the tool name when the operation is completed successfully. The Manawatu-Wanganui region is selected in the table and on the map. It is the only region that satisfies your query.

    Map showing selected region
  10. On the ribbon, on the Map tab, in the Selection group, click Clear Clear.

Summarize table values

The Regions table contains attribute values for each region but no totals or statistics. Suppose you want to know whether the North Island or the South Island has more sheep. To find out, you need to total the values in the Sheep 2014 field for the regions on both islands.

Totals and other statistics can be created by summarizing a table or by creating a chart of field statistics. In this case, you'll summarize a table. When you summarize a table, a new standalone output table is created with the statistics you request. In this project, a table with totals for the North Island has already been created. You'll make a similar table for the South Island.

  1. In the Contents pane, under Standalone Tables, right-click North_Island_Statistics and click Open Open Table.

    The table contains one record. The numeric fields in the Regions table have been totaled for the nine regions on the North Island. Notice the value in the SUM_SHEEP_2014 field. Altogether, there were 14,362,494 sheep on the North Island in 2014.

  2. On the ribbon, on the Map tab, in the Selection group, click the Select drop-down menu and click Polygon Select By Polygon.
  3. On the map, draw a polygon that encloses or intersects all the regions on the South Island and no regions on the North Island. Click to begin drawing the polygon, click to change direction, and double-click to finish.
    South Island regions selected on map

    Seven features should be selected on the map and you should see the message Selected Features: 7 in the lower right corner of the map view.

    If you have a different number of selected records, clear the selection and try again. Alternatively, hold the Shift key and draw a polygon to add features to the selection, or hold the Ctrl key and draw a polygon to remove features from the selection. A small region that's easy to miss is Nelson, which lies between Tasman and Marlborough.

  4. Make the Regions table active. Confirm that the seven selected records are Otago, Canterbury, Southland, Marlborough, Tasman, West Coast, and Nelson.
  5. In the Regions table, right-click the Sheep 2014 field heading and click Summarize Summarize.

    The Geoprocessing pane opens to the Summary Statistics tool. Under Parameters, the Input Table is correctly set to Regions.

    Note:

    Right-clicking the Sheep 2014 field heading and clicking Statistics Statistics is another way to find the total number of sheep for the selected records. A chart is created instead of a table and several statistics appear in the Chart Properties pane. See Histogram for more information.

  6. Change the Output Table name to South_Island_Statistics.
    Tip:

    When you begin typing in the Output Table box, you'll see the path to your project geodatabase. You can either replace the default table name at the end of the path or you can delete the entire path and type the new output table name—the full path will be restored automatically.

  7. Under Statistics Field(s), next to Field, click the Add Many button Add Many.
  8. Select the check boxes next to Area in Square Km, Beef Cattle 2014, Dairy Cattle 2014, and Sheep 2014.
    List of statistics fields
  9. Click Add to add the checked items.

    Under Statistic Type, the SUM statistic is applied by default to numeric fields.

  10. In the Case field parameter, click in the box containing Sheep 2014 and click the Remove button Remove to the left of the field name.
    Summary Statistics tool

    Case fields allow you to get subtotals on statistics, but you don't need to do that here.

  11. Click Run Run.
  12. In the Contents pane, under Standalone Tables, right-click South_Island_Statistics and click Open Open Table.

    In the SUM_SHEEP_2014 field, you see that there are 15,378,674 sheep on the South Island—about a million more than on the North Island. Sheep are important livestock on both islands.

    Note:

    Aliases and numeric formatting in a layer attribute table are not maintained when the table is summarized.

  13. Close the South_Island_Statistics table and the North_Island_Statistics table.
  14. With the Regions table active, in the row of tools at the top of the table, click Clear Clear Selection.
  15. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save Save.

Chart sheep distribution by region

You've sorted, queried, and summarized the Regions attribute table. Now you'll visualize the distribution of sheep with a chart.

  1. In the Contents pane, click the Regions layer to select it.
  2. On the ribbon, under Feature Layer, click the Data tab. In the Visualize group, click Create Chart Create Chart and click Bar Chart Bar Chart.

    The Chart Properties pane opens. A Regions: Bar Chart 1 view also opens. The view is empty until you fill out parameters in the Chart Properties pane.

  3. Near the top of the Chart Properties pane, confirm that the Data tab is selected. Click the Category or Date drop-down arrow and click Name.

    In the chart view, the region names appear on the chart's x-axis. At the moment, the chart displays the number of region names per region (which is 1). You need to choose the field values that you want to chart.

  4. In the Chart Properties pane, under Series, confirm that the option From one or more fields is selected. Click the Fields drop-down arrow—next to the current Count(Name) field—and click Sheep 2014.
    Sheep 2014 field added to chart series

    The chart's y-axis and data bars update to show the number of sheep in each region. You may not see values on the y-axis if your chart view is too small. You'll resize the chart in a moment.

    Tip:

    You can pick additional fields to compare values. For example, you can add the SHEEP_2004 field to see the ten-year change in sheep numbers for each region. The bar chart colors will no longer match the symbology of the Regions layer, however.

  5. At the top of the Chart Properties pane, click the General tab.
  6. In the Chart title box, change the title to New Zealand Sheep by Region in 2014 and press Enter.

    The title is updated on the chart.

  7. In the X axis title box, change the title to Region Name and press Enter.
  8. In the Y axis title box, change the title to Number of Sheep and press Enter.
  9. On the chart view, click Sort Sort and click Y-axis Descending Sort Descending.
  10. Undock the chart view and float it away from the ArcGIS Pro application window. Resize the chart by dragging its corners or edges.
    Bar chart

    You should see all 16 regions labeled on the x-axis and data values labeled on the y-axis. The number of data values you see depends on the size of the chart.

    Tip:

    You can filter the chart to see fewer regions. To filter by selection, select features on the map or records in the table. In the chart view, click Filter: Selection Filter by Selection. To filter by extent, zoom the map to your area of interest. In the chart view, click Filter: Extent Filter By Extent. You can also use selection and extent filters together. To remove a filter, click the selected filter button in the chart view.

  11. Hover over a bar on the chart.

    Callout text on the chart reports the exact number of sheep in the region.

  12. With the mouse pointer, draw a box on the chart that intersects the four tallest bars.

    The bars are selected on the chart. The corresponding table records and map features are also selected. On the map, you can see that three of the four regions with the most sheep are on the South Island.

  13. Click some white space on the chart to deselect the bars.
  14. Close the chart and close the Chart Properties pane.
    Note:
    The chart is stored in your project and can be reopened at any time. To open it, click the List By Charts tab List By Charts at the top of the Contents pane. Expand the Regions layer to see the chart. Right-click the chart name and click Open Open.
  15. Close the Regions table.
  16. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save Save.

Configure pop-ups

You can customize pop-ups with text, charts, and images. Recall that the Regions table has an IMAGE_URL attribute with links to images. You'll configure pop-ups so that when you click a region on the map, you'll see an image of that region in the pop-up window.

  1. In the Contents pane, right-click the Regions layer and click Configure Pop-ups Configure pop-ups.

    The Pop-ups pane opens. It has buttons along the top for working with text, fields, charts, and images. Under the row of buttons, the pop-up title is set to display the {REGIONNAME} value in the pop-up window title bar.

    Under the pop-up title is a Fields element for configuring fields. It says Fields(5) because there are currently five fields displayed in the pop-up.

  2. In the Pop-ups pane, click Image Image.
  3. On the Image element, click Edit pop-up element Edit pop-up element.
  4. In the Title box, delete the default title.
  5. Click in the Source URL box. At the top of the pane, under Image Options, click the Field drop-down list and click IMAGE URL {IMAGE_URL}.
    Image options in the Pop-ups pane
    Note:

    The Field drop-down list shows both the alias, IMAGE_URL, and the name {IMAGE_URL} in curly brackets. In this case, the alias and the name are the same.

    When you click a region on the map, the linked image in the corresponding table record will be displayed in the pop-up. Since a different link is stored in each record, you'll see a different image for each region.

  6. In the Pop-ups pane, click the Back button Back.
  7. On the ribbon, click the Map tab. In the Navigate group, click Explore Explore Tool.
  8. Click a region on the map to see its pop-up.
    Configured pop-up on map
  9. Click some other regions to see their pop-ups.

    On your own, you may want to configure the pop-ups further. Images can have titles and captions as well as hyperlinks. You can add a text element to include custom text on the pop-up. You can add a chart element to display different chart types for selected attributes.

    Tip:

    To restore the pop-up configuration to its previous state, click Reset at the bottom of the Pop-ups pane.

  10. Close the open pop-up. Leave the Contents and Catalog panes open and close any other panes.
  11. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save Save.

Now that you have experience with attributes, try the Symbolize map layers and Label your map tutorials to see how attributes are used in map authoring.

Descriptions of New Zealand's agricultural economy in this tutorial were taken from several online sources. For information on the history of economic development in New Zealand, see the article on economic history in Te Ara: The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. For information on the present state of the economy, see New Zealand Economic and Financial Overview 2015 from the New Zealand Treasury as well as Agricultural Production Statistics: June 2014 (final) from Statistics New Zealand.

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