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Alternate name table

Contents of an alternate name table

Names of features, such as streets, change over time. For example, Jefferson Rd is a new official name for the street that was previously called Old Country Rd. Searching for a feature by all of its possible names can increase the success rate of matching. The alternate name table contains fields for the additional street names. Each record represents one name for a feature. Additional names can be added to the table.

An alternate name table

Join ID

The alternate name table must have an ID field that can be used to join the records to the primary feature class. If one feature has multiple names, the JoinID field for the alternate street names of the same feature contains the same value.

The primary feature class must have a field that contains a unique ID value for each record. It can be either the object ID or a user-defined ID field that can be used to join the Join ID from the alternate name table.

Table attributes

Depending on the locator style you choose and the type of features you want to search, attributes in the alternate name table are similar to the table of the primary feature class. For a street address, attributes including prefix direction, prefix type, street name, street type, and suffix direction are used for representing the alternate street names.

Note:

Only valid data type values to indicate the record is NULL should be used and should not contain any other string characters in the reference data tables to successfully build an address locator with an alternate name table.

Learn more about reference data requirements for the variety of locator styles

Contents of an alternate city name table

You may have a neighborhood in a city or an official city name versus a commonly used name where either could be used when searching for an address. For example, North Park is a neighborhood in San Diego. Another example may be that a specific ZIP Code might have multiple valid city names; for example, 08648 is the ZIP Code that is valid for Lawrence, NJ; Lawrence Twp, NJ; and Trenton, NJ. Searching for a feature by all of its possible names can increase the success rate of matching. The alternate city name table contains the fields for the additional city names. Each record represents one name for a feature. Additional names can be added to the table. The reference data Role for the alternate city name table in the Create Address Locator tool is called Alternate City Name Table.

An alternate city name table

Join ID

The alternate city name table must have an ID field that can be used to join the records to the primary feature class. If one feature has multiple names, the JoinID field for the alternate city names of the same feature contains the same value.

The primary feature class must have a field that contains a unique ID value for each record. It can be either the object ID or a user ID field, such as city ID or ZIP Code, that can be used to join the Join ID from the alternate city name table.

Table attributes

Depending on the locator style you choose and the type of features you want to search, attributes in the alternate city name table that are similar to the table of the primary feature class are the Join ID and city value. City is used for representing the alternate city names when using the following locator styles: Dual Ranges, One Range, Single House, and Single House Subaddress.

Learn more about reference data requirements for the variety of locator styles

Building a locator for alternate names

Creating locators that use alternate name tables is similar to creating those that do not. There are, however, some additional elements that must be included. By combining these tasks, a locator can be created that includes alternate names.

Note:

When building the address locator with primary and alternate name reference data tables, the number and type of street address attribute fields that are selected in the Field map must match in order to return a match when searching for an alternate street name. For example, if the full street name is contained in the primary table street name field, the full alternate street name must be contained in the street name field of the alternate name table. The two street name fields need to be the only street component fields selected in the field map.

See Create a locator to learn how to create an address locator. The following steps describe how to add the alternate table and specify the fields in the Create Address Locator tool pane:

  1. In the Create Address Locator tool pane, click Browse Browse next to the Reference Data text box.

    The Reference Data dialog box appears.

  2. Browse to the reference data you want to use as your primary feature class for the locator, and click Open.
  3. Click the drop-down arrow under the Role column, and select Primary Table.
  4. Repeat step 1, and browse for the alternate name table.
  5. Click the drop-down arrow under the Role column, and choose Alternate Name Table.

    Fields in the Field Map are automatically mapped.

    Alternate name table field mapping

  6. If the field map is not completed, select the appropriate field in the table for each field.

    It is essential to make sure that the JoinID fields for both primary and alternate name tables are selected. In the Alias Name column, click the drop-down arrow for the Primary Table:Altname JoinID field, and choose the JoinID field from the primary feature class, for instance, streets:JOINID. Then, click the drop-down arrow for the Alternate Name Table:JoinID field, and choose the JoinID field from the alternate name table, such as altname:JOINID. This is the field that contains the JoinID value and is used to refer back to the primary table.

  7. Continue the steps for creating the locator.

    Using this locator, addresses in either primary or alternate names tables can be searched. For example, searching 100 Jefferson Rd or 100 Old Country Rd returns the same location.

Building a locator for alternate city names

  1. In the Create Address Locator tool pane, click Browse Browse next to the Reference Data text box.

    The Reference Data dialog box appears.

  2. Browse to the reference data you want to use as your primary feature class for the locator, and click Open.
  3. Click the drop-down arrow under the Role column, and select Primary Table.
  4. Repeat step 1, and browse for the alternate city name table.
  5. Click the drop-down arrow under the Role column, and choose Alternate City Name Table.

    Fields in the Field Map are automatically mapped.

    Create alternate city locator

  6. If the field map is not completed, select the appropriate field in the table for each field.

    It is essential to make sure that the JoinID fields for both primary and alternate city name tables are selected. In the Alias Name column, click the drop-down arrow for the Primary Table:City Altname JoinID field, and choose the JoinID field from the primary feature class, for instance, streets:JOINID. Then, click the drop-down arrow for the Alternate City Name Table:JoinID field, and choose the JoinID field from the alternate city name table, such as altcity:JOINID. This is the field that contains the JoinID value and is used to refer back to the primary table.

  7. Continue the steps for creating the locator.

    Using this locator, address and city in either primary or alternate city name tables can be searched. For example, searching 192 Little John Trl NE, Atlanta or 192 Little John Trl NE, Sherwood Forest returns the same location.

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