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Bitwise Not function

Available with Image Analyst license.

Available with Spatial Analyst license.

Overview

Performs a Bitwise Not (complement) operation on the binary value of an input raster.

Learn more about how Bitwise math tools work

Bitwise Not illustration

Notes

If an input is floating point data type, the values are converted to integer values through truncation before the bitwise operation is performed.

All bitwise operations have the following in common:

  • Binary values are stored in two's complement.
  • The tools work on 32-bit integers.
  • The leftmost bit position is reversed for the sign (positive or negative) of the value. If the integer is positive, the bit position is 0; if it's negative, the bit position is 1.

The Bitwise Not operation treats the sign bit as it would any other bit. If the input for a pixel location is negative, the output is negative; if the input is positive, the output is positive.

Parameters

Parameter nameDescription

Raster

The input raster on which to perform the Bitwise Not (complement) operation.

Extent Type

Choose which extent should be used in the output raster:

  • First Of—Use the extent of the first input raster to determine the processing extent.

  • Intersection Of—Use the extent of the overlapping pixels to determine the processing extent. This is the default.
  • Union Of—Use the extent of all the rasters to determine the processing extent.
  • Last Of—Use the extent of the last input raster to determine the processing extent.

Cellsize Type

Choose which cell size to use in the output raster. If all the input cell sizes are the same, all the options will yield the same results.

  • First Of—Use the first cell size of the input rasters.
  • Min Of—Use the smallest cell size of all the input rasters.
  • Max Of—Use the largest cell size of all the input rasters. This is the default.
  • Mean Of—Use the mean cell size of all the input rasters.
  • Last Of—Use the last cell size of the input rasters.

Learn more about bitwise

The bitwise tools evaluate the binary representation of the input values on a pixel-by-pixel basis. For each bit in the binary representation, a Boolean operation is performed.

The logic of how the various bitwise tools operate is illustrated in the following sections. The arrows are used to indicate the flow of operation of how input values are converted to a base2 binary representation, analyzed, and returned as a decimal (base10) value.

Learn more about how Bitwise Not works

For Bitwise Not, the bitwise complement of the binary representation of an input value is determined. This means that for each input bit that is 1, the output is 0. Input bits that are 0 will be output as 1.

Bitwise Not example
Bitwise Not example