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Export or convert raster datasets

There are two main ways to export or convert raster data to another format: using the Export Raster pane or the Copy Raster geoprocessing tool.

The pane allows you to export a raster dataset or a portion of a raster dataset. Unlike other raster import or export tools, the Export Raster pane gives you additional capabilities such as clipping, changing the spatial reference, using the current renderer, choosing the output cell size, and specifying the NoData value. In addition, you can choose the output format for the raster dataset.

When exporting your data to a file-based raster dataset using a clipping option, it is recommended that you enter a NoData value. When a graphic is used to clip your data, NoData pixels will most likely exist in the output. Specifying the NoData value allows you to control the pixel depth and the value that will store NoData. If a NoData value is not specified, the system will find an empty value to use as the NoData placeholder, which may not be desired or expected.

Export Raster pane

The Export Raster pane allows you to export the entire raster dataset or the portion in the display.

  1. In the Contents pane, right-click the raster layer you want to export, click Data, and click Export Raster. The Export Raster pane appears with two tabs, General and Settings.
    General

    Provides options to specify the Output Raster Dataset, Coordinate System, Geographic Transformations, Clipping Geometry, Cell Size, Raster Size, Pixel Type, NoData value, Renderer settings, Output Format, Compression Type, and Compression Quality.

    Settings

    Allows you to configure Snap Raster,Tile Size, Resampling, Source Type, pyramids settings, and statistics settings.

    You can also open this pane by clicking the Export Raster button on the Data tab.

  2. Choose the appropriate output as required in the Output Raster Dataset field. Click the Browse button and browse to the proper location to save the exported raster dataset.

    When storing a raster dataset in a geodatabase, no file extension should be added to the name of the raster dataset. When storing the raster dataset in a file format, you need to specify the file-appropriate extension.

  3. The Coordinate System field is automatically populated with the coordinate system of the source raster layer that is being exported. If a vertical coordinate system is associated with the source raster, it will be displayed as an option for selection. If you want to change the coordinate system, click the Coordinate System button Coordinate System to open the Spatial Reference dialog box.

    Export Raster Spatial Reference dialog box

    The Spatial Reference dialog box is contextual and will list either an xy- or a z-coordinate system depending on whether you select the Current XY or Current Z coordinate system option.

  4. Select your spatial reference system and click OK.
    1. Select the appropriate Geographic Transformation when your data is transformed between different coordinate systems. The application will only use those transformations appropriate to the projection, all others will be ignored.
  5. Choose the appropriate Clipping Geometry option to use for the exported raster.
    Default

    This option will export the raster dataset using the spatial referencing specifications of the raster dataset.

    Current Display Extent

    The extent of the current display will be used.

    For example, if you are zoomed in to your particular study area, you can use this option to process features that fall within the current display extent.

    As Specified Below

    You enter the coordinates of the minimum bounding rectangle: type the extent for Left, Right, Top, and Bottom.

    <Layers>

    All layers are listed, and you can choose one to use as the extent.

    As with the Current Display Extent option, the extent of the layer is read and stored.

    Browse

    Use the Browse button to browse to the folder location of the feature class you want to use for Clipping Geometry. Once an input feature is provided, a check box appears with the Use Input Features for Clipping Geometry option, with clipping options to clip Inside or Outside.

  6. Set the Cell Size for the output raster dataset. The default value is automatically populated with the pixel size of the source raster layer.
  7. Set the Raster Size for the raster dataset. The default value is automatically populated with the extent of the input raster dataset, in columns and rows.

    Raster Size and Cell Size are contextual, and depend on the Clipping Geometry setting. Setting the Raster Size will automatically set the corresponding Cell Size determined by Clipping Geometry. Similarly, setting the Cell Size parameter will automatically adjust the Raster Size setting to the appropriate value determined by the Clipping Geometry value.

  8. Set the Pixel Type of the output raster dataset. The default value is automatically populated with the pixel type of the source raster layer.
  9. Specify a NoData value for your output.

    This is recommended if you are exporting to a file-based raster dataset and graphic clipping is chosen. When a graphic is used to clip your data, NoData pixels will most likely exist in the output. Specifying the NoData value allows you to control the pixel depth and the value that will store NoData.

  10. Optionally, choose an option under Renderer Settings.
    Force RGB

    Check the Force RGB check box if you want to export the output raster as a three-band RGB raster dataset with the current renderer.

    Use Colormap

    The Use Colormap check box is enabled only if your source raster contains a color map that can be used while exporting.

    Use Renderer

    Check the Use Renderer check box if you want to export the raster dataset with the current renderer statistics and options. When you open the exported raster dataset in ArcGIS Pro, the default rendering rules are applied. To keep the rendering the same as when you exported the data, set the stretch type to None, since it is already stretched.

  11. Use the drop-down box to select the Output Format in which to save the raster export.
    1. Choose the Compression Type if your output format allows for it.
    2. Choose the Compression Quality if your output format is JP2 or JPG.
  12. Click the Settings tab at the top of the pane to continue with other settings.
  13. Use the Snap Raster setting to adjust the extent of output rasters so that they match the pixel alignment of the specified snap raster.
  14. Set the Width and Height for the Tile Size for output rasters that are stored in blocks of data. This will only affect rasters that are stored in a geodatabase or a TIFF file. The default tile size is 128x128 pixels.

    When rasters are stored as blocks of data, they store raster datasets in a data type known as a binary large object (BLOB). The tile size option allows you to control the number of pixels that are stored in each BLOB and, therefore, allows you to control the size of each BLOB. It is specified as the number of pixels in X (tile width) and Y (tile height).

  15. Choose which Resample method to use when creating the output.

    Resampling is the process of interpolating the pixel values while transforming your raster dataset. This is used when the input and output do not line up exactly, when the pixel size changes, when the data is shifted, or a combination of these.

    Nearest Neighbor

    Performs a nearest neighbor assignment and is the fastest of the interpolation methods. It is used primarily for discrete data, such as a land-use classification, since it will not change the values of the pixels. The maximum spatial error will be half a pixel.

    Bilinear

    Performs a bilinear interpolation and determines the new value of a pixel based on a weighted distance average of the four nearest input pixel centers. It is useful for continuous data and will cause some smoothing of the data.

    Cubic

    Performs a cubic convolution and determines the new value of a pixel based on fitting a smooth curve through the 16 nearest input pixel centers. It is appropriate for continuous data, although it may result in the output raster containing values outside the range of the input raster. It is geometrically less distorted than the raster achieved by running the Nearest Neighbor resampling algorithm. The disadvantage of the Cubic option is that it requires more processing time. In some cases, it can result in output pixel values outside the range of input pixel values. If processing time is an issue, use Bilinear instead.

  16. Set the Source Type to define whether the pixel values represent elevation or categorical data, or whether the values have been processed by other methods and do not require stretching when displaying the data.
    Generic

    There is no specified data type.

    Elevation

    The raster is an elevation data type.

    Thematic

    The raster is a thematic data type that has discrete values, such as land cover.

    Processed

    The raster has been color processed and should not be contrast stretched.

    Scientific

    The raster has scientific information and will be displayed with the blue to red color ramp by default.

    Vector UV

    The raster is a two-band raster that contains a U and a V component of vector field data.

    Magnitude and Direction

    The raster is a two-band raster that contains the magnitude and direction of vector field data.

  17. Choose the Pyramids settings for your output raster. Check the Build check box to build the pyramids for the output raster. If you check this check box, you can further refine your pyramid options.
    1. Specify the number of Pyramid levels. You can specify the number of levels to create, or you can leave the value blank to build all levels.
    2. Check the Skip First check box to skip the first pyramid level for your raster.
    3. Specify the pyramid Resampling Technique used to build your pyramids: Nearest Neighbor, Bilinear, or Cubic.
    4. Choose the pyramid Compression Type to use when building the raster pyramids.
      • Default—The system will detect an appropriate compression type. If the source data is compressed using a wavelet compression, it will build pyramids with the JPEG compression type; otherwise, LZ77 will be used.
      • None—No compression will be used when building pyramids.
      • LZ77—The LZ77 compression algorithm will be used to build the pyramids. LZ77 can be used for any data type.
      • JPEG—The JPEG compression algorithm will be used to build pyramids. Only data that adheres to the JPEG compression specification can use this compression type. If JPEG is chosen, you can then set the Compression Quality.
      • JPEG YCbCr—A lossy compression using the luma (Y) and chroma (Cb and Cr) color space components.
    5. Select the Compression Quality to use when pyramids are built with the JPEG compression method.
  18. Choose the Statistics settings for your output raster. Check the Calculate check box to calculate the statistics for the output raster. If you check this check box, you can further refine your pyramid options.
    1. Choose whether you want to skip pixels between samples. The X Skip Factor and Y Skip Factor settings represent the number of horizontal and vertical pixels between samples, respectively. The value must be greater than zero and less than or equal to the number of columns or rows in the raster dataset.
    2. The Statistics ignore value(s) setting allows you to ignore one or more values that will not participate in the statistics calculation, such as a background value. Multiple values are separated by semicolons.
  19. Once all your parameters have been set, click Export.

When the export is completed, it adds the exported raster dataset to the map.

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  1. Export Raster pane