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Files, tables, and web services raster types

Raster types supported by ArcGIS are listed in the Raster Type drop-down list on the Add Rasters To Mosaic Dataset tool. If your organization has created its own raster type, or if you have modified the properties for a raster type and saved it, you may have to browse to the .art file to choose it. Raster types can be divided into two groups: those describing files, tables, or web services and those describing products, typically from satellite sensors.

CADRG/ECRG

Compressed ARC Digitized Raster Graphics (CADRG) and Enhanced Compressed Raster Graphic (ECRG) data can be added to a mosaic dataset using the CADRG raster type or the raster dataset raster type.

It is recommended that you use the CADRG/ECRG raster type when adding CADRG or ECRG data to a mosaic dataset. The following are advantages of using this type when adding CADRG data:

  • Metadata fields are added and populated in the mosaic dataset's attribute table. You can then query the attribute table for specific raster data. Fields added include Name, Product Name, FileDateTime, and Security Classification.
  • The logic used is well-suited for the CADRG/ECRG data type. For example, when duplicate data is encountered (when a dataset you are adding is already in the mosaic dataset), the logic used to determine which data is overwritten is tailored to the nature of CADRG/ECRG data.

RPF a.toc files cannot be added to a mosaic dataset. Use the CADRG/ECRG raster type to add your collection of files.

By accessing the Raster Type Properties dialog box, you can alter the filters used when adding the data on the General tab. You can also modify the band combination on the Properties tab.

For more information about the CADRG/ECRG raster format, see Supported raster dataset file formats.

CIB

Controlled Image Base (CIB) data can be added to a mosaic dataset using the CIB raster type or the raster dataset raster type.

It is recommended that you use the CIB raster type when adding CIB data to a mosaic dataset. There are advantages to using this type when CIB data is added:

  • Metadata fields are added and populated in the mosaic dataset's attribute table. You can then query this attribute table for imagery. Fields added include Product Name, FileDateTime, and Security Classification.
  • The logic used is well-suited for the CIB data type. For example, when duplicate data is encountered (when a dataset you are adding is already in the mosaic dataset), the logic used to determine which data is overwritten is tailored to the nature of CIB data.

RPF a.toc files cannot be added to a mosaic dataset. Use the CIB raster type to add your collection of CIB files.

By accessing the Raster Type Properties dialog box, you can alter the filters used when adding the data on the General tab. You can also modify the band combination on the Properties tab.

For more information about the CIB raster format, see Supported raster dataset file formats.

DTED

Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data in DTED format can be added to a mosaic dataset using the DTED raster type or the raster dataset raster type.

It is recommended that you use the DTED raster type when adding DTED data to a mosaic dataset. You will gain several advantages:

  • Metadata fields are added and populated in the mosaic dataset's attribute table. You can then query this attribute table for imagery. The fields added are Product Name, Data Edition, Compilation Date, Maintenance Date, Match/Merge Version, Match/Merge Date, Latitude-Longitude Location, and Security Classification.
  • The logic used is well-suited for the DTED data type. For example, when duplicate data is encountered (when a dataset you are adding is already in the mosaic dataset), the logic used to determine which data is overwritten is tailored to the nature of DTED data.

For more information about the DTED raster format, see Supported raster dataset file formats.

HRE

High Resolution Elevation (HRE) data is intended for a wide variety of National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG) partners and members, and customers external to the NSG, to access and exploit standardized data products. HRE data replaces the current nonstandard High Resolution Terrain Elevation/Information (HRTE/HRTI) products and also replaces nonstandard products referred to as DTED levels 3 through 6.

This data format is similar to NITF.

Image service definition

The image service definition raster type allows you to add image service definition (.ISDef) files created with the Image Service Definition Editor toolbar (installed by ArcGIS Image Server, versions 9.2 to 10). You can add these files by pointing to either a particular file or a workspace or folder location containing many .ISDef files.

Using this raster type is the recommended way to migrate image service definitions into mosaic datasets.

This raster type will add the contents from the image service definition's footprint table and will translate the required information from the associated .RPDef files. Any processes applied on the rasters will be converted to the appropriate function in the mosaic dataset. Any processes or properties set on the image service definition (defined in the .ISDef file) will not be carried over to the mosaic dataset. You will need to edit the processes and properties on the mosaic dataset to reapply what you may have defined within the image service definition.

Image Service Reference

The image Service Reference raster type allows you to add image service reference (.ISRef) files created from image services (typically served from ArcGIS Image Server, versions 9.2 to 10). You can add these files by pointing to either a particular file or a workspace or folder location containing many .ISRef files.

The .ISRef file defines an image service connection and the set of service properties.

LAS

LAS is an industry format created and maintained by the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS). LAS is an open/published standard file format for the interchange of light detection and ranging (lidar) data. Lidar data contains measures of distances obtained through an optical (active) remote sensing technology.

You can add LAS files as individual files or as a folder to a mosaic dataset. When this data is added to a mosaic dataset it is converted into raster data.

When adding this data to a mosaic dataset, you must enter an output pixel size. To do this, open the Raster Type Properties dialog box, click the LAS tab, and enter a Pixel size value.

LAS Dataset

A LAS dataset is generated by ArcGIS to store and manage collections of LAS files. It stores references to one or more LAS files (containing lidar point cloud data) on disk and to features containing surface constraints. It allows you to quickly display the data as point clouds or triangulated surfaces in ArcGIS, provides the capability to edit the source LAS files, and more.

When this data is added to a mosaic dataset it is converted into raster data.

When adding this data to a mosaic dataset, you must enter an output pixel size. To do this, open the Raster Type Properties dialog box, click the LAS Dataset tab, and enter a Pixel size value.

Mosaic dataset

There is no mosaic dataset raster type. To add a mosaic dataset to another mosaic dataset, use the table raster type or raster dataset raster type. If you use the table raster type, the attribute table from the input mosaic dataset will be copied into the receiving mosaic dataset. Therefore, all the items in the from mosaic dataset will continue to be individual items in the receiving mosaic dataset. If you use the raster dataset raster type, the input mosaic dataset will be added as a single item in the receiving mosaic dataset's attribute table.

NITF

The NITF raster type is used to add NITF version 1.1, 2.0, and 2.1 datasets to a mosaic dataset and extract specific metadata items to the attribute table.

By accessing the Raster Type Properties dialog box, you can modify the band combination and specify the elevation parameter for data being orthorectified on the Properties tab.

Raster Dataset

The Raster Dataset raster type is used to add any raster dataset (file format) supported by ArcGIS. To obtain the full list, see Supported raster dataset file formats.

Raster Process Definition

The Raster Process Definition raster type allows you to add raster process definition (.RPDef) files. You can add these files by pointing to either a particular file or a workspace or folder location containing many .RPDef files.

These files were created with the Image Service Definition Editor (installed by ArcGIS Image Server, versions 9.2 to 10) when raster data was added to an image service definition; however, you can generate your own if necessary. The .RPDef file is an XML file that contains information about a raster dataset:

  • Footprint—The footprint of the data pixels.
  • Spatial reference—Spatial reference system of the raster dataset.
  • Number of bands—Number of bands in the raster dataset.
  • Pixel type—Numeric type of pixel value, for example, 8-bit integer or 32-bit float.
  • Bit depth—Out of the number of bits available, how many contain actual values. For example, the data may be stored using 16 bits, but the data is actually 11 bits.
  • Seamline—The seamline polygon to be used when a seamline mosaic is created.
  • High and low pixel size range—These define the range of pixel values that exist in the raster dataset. For example, in a simple orthorectified image, both the high and low values may be the same, corresponding to the resolution of the imagery. Datasets that include pyramids or multiple overlapping rasters can have a range of pixel sizes.
  • Histogram statistics—The histogram and histogram statistics for the raster dataset. There can be multiple histograms representing both the unprocessed rasters and raster output from raster processes.
  • Metadata—Data providing information about the raster. This data is extracted from the source, depending on the raster type. For generic raster types, such as GeoTIFF, the amount of metadata available can be limited. For more specific raster types, such as QuickBird, the metadata can include a number of different attributes such as date and time of acquisition.
  • Raster group process—Definition of the raster datasets process chain to be applied to all rasters within the raster dataset.
  • Multiple raster items—A raster process definition contains the definition of one or more rasters. Each has a definition—raster processes as well as information—about the format, the location of the pixels, and metadata such as histogram statistics.

When you add these files, the .RPDef will be checked and the location of the raster data will be verified, or it will not be added to the mosaic dataset. Any processes defined in the .RPDef will be converted to the appropriate function.

Search Index

Using the Search Index raster type allows you to add rasters that are the results of the Search window.

The Search window allows you to search for all raster data types: raster datasets, mosaic datasets, raster products, mosaic dataset items, and image service items. The search can find rasters based on many image properties, or keyword searches. You can also perform a structured search using the key properties of imagery. Structured searches will be more specific than keyword searches, allowing you to narrow down your search results.

SOCET SET

Using the SOCET SET raster type allows you to add .Sup files generated by BAE Systems SOCET SET software. This supports both satellite and aerial imagery, where both frame\standard transforms and RPC transforms are supported.

Table / Raster Catalog

Using the Table/Raster Catalog raster type, you can add the following to your mosaic dataset:

  • Mosaic dataset
  • Table with paths
  • .dbf file (for example, from a footprint shapefile)

There is no mosaic dataset raster type. To add a mosaic dataset to another mosaic dataset, use the Table raster type or Raster Dataset raster type. If you use the Table raster type, the attribute table from the input mosaic dataset will be copied into the receiving mosaic dataset. Therefore, all the items in the from mosaic dataset will continue to be individual items in the receiving mosaic dataset. If you use the Raster Dataset raster type, the input mosaic dataset will be added as a single item in the receiving mosaic dataset's attribute table.

You can add raster data to a mosaic dataset using any ArcGIS supported table using the Table/Raster Catalog raster type. Your table must have a field, named Raster, that contains the path and name of every raster dataset you want to be added to the mosaic dataset. The Table/Raster Catalog raster type is looking for four specific fields, which will be used to populate the default fields in the mosaic dataset attribute table. You will identify these in the Raster Type Properties dialog box. These are as follows:

  • Raster—The source raster field that contains the path and name of a supported raster dataset file format. This will be used to identify the raster dataset to add to the mosaic dataset. This field is required.
  • Name—Name used to identify the source raster. This will be used as the Name attribute for the raster dataset in the mosaic dataset. This field is optional.
  • Group—A name given to one or more rows in the table that belong together. This will be used as the Group attribute for the raster dataset in the mosaic dataset. This field is optional.
  • Tag—Used to identify the raster dataset that will participate in functions defined in a function template. This will be used as the Tag attribute for the raster dataset in the mosaic dataset. This field is optional.

If there are other fields in your table, they will be added to the mosaic dataset attribute table.

If you want to add large volumes of raster data that has its raster information in any of the supported tabular data sources, you have to provide the raster information as individual fields in the input data source. These fields contain required raster information, and the rasters do not have access to retrieve any of the information when the data is added using the Table raster type. The data source should contain the following fields.

FieldExplanationData TypeRequired

Raster

The source raster field that contains the path and name of a supported raster dataset file format. This will be used to identify the raster dataset to add to the mosaic dataset.

Text/Raster

Yes

xMin

The x-coordinate of the raster's lower left corner.

Double

Yes (if Shape field is not present)

yMin

The y-coordinate of the raster's lower left corner.

Double

xMax

The x-coordinate of the raster's upper right corner.

Double

yMax

The y-coordinate of the raster's upper right corner.

Double

nRows

The number of rows in the raster.

Long Integer

Yes

nCols

The number of columns in the raster.

Long Integer

Yes

nBands

The number of spectral bands in the raster.

Long Integer

Yes

PixelType

The data type used to represent pixel values of the raster, such as signed integer, unsigned integer, or floating point.

These data types are represented by the following values:

  • -1 – Unknown
  • 0 – 1 bit
  • 1 – 2 bits
  • 2 – 4 bits
  • 3 – Unsigned 8-bit integers
  • 4 – 8 bit integers
  • 5 – Unsigned 16-bit integers
  • 6 – 16-bit integers
  • 7 – Unsigned 32-bit integers
  • 8 – 32-bit integers
  • 9 – Single Precision Floating Point
  • 10 – Double Precision Floating Point
  • 11 – Single Precision Complex
  • 12 – Double Precision Complex
  • 13 – Short Integer Complex
  • 14 – Long Integer Complex

Long Integer

Yes

SRS

The coordinate system of the raster.

Long Integer/Text

No

Shape

The footprint polygon.

Polygon

Yes (if xMin, yMin, xMax, and yMax fields are not present)

These fields in the input data source contain raster information.

The extent of the raster is computed based on the xMin, xMax, yMin, yMax, and SRS fields in the input data source. If this information is not available and if a polygon is provided in the Shape field of the input data source, the extent of the raster is calculated based on the envelope of the polygon.

Note:

If the coordinate system information is not available in the data source, it defaults to the mosaic dataset coordinate system.

There are two processing templates for the Table raster type that can be picked from the Raster Type Properties dialog box:

  • Default—This adds the raster data to the mosaic dataset without applying any functions.
  • Stretch—This applies the Stretch function to each raster dataset as it’s added to the mosaic dataset.

Terrain

A terrain dataset is a multiresolution, TIN-based surface built from measurements stored as features in a geodatabase. They're typically made from lidar, sonar, and photogrammetric sources. Terrains reside in the geodatabase, inside feature datasets with the features used to construct them.

The Terrain raster type allows you to add the terrain dataset to a mosaic dataset. When this data is added to a mosaic dataset, it is converted into raster data.

When adding this data to a mosaic dataset, you must enter an output pixel size. To do this, open the Raster Type Properties dialog box, click the Terrain tab, and enter a Pixel size value.

Web services

You can add several types of web services as source data to a mosaic dataset. Web service-specific raster types include the following:

  • Image Service—Image services from ArcGIS Server
  • Map Service—Cached map services from ArcGIS Server or from ArcGIS Online
  • WCS—Web Coverage Service (OGC standard)
  • WMS—Web Map Service (OGC standard)

When you add a web service from ArcGIS Server, a WCS service, or a WMS service, you can make the connection directly to the server within the Add Rasters To Mosaic Dataset tool, or you can enter the URL. To add a web service from ArcGIS Online to the mosaic dataset, you must first save it as a layer file.

Image service

When adding an image service to the mosaic dataset, the default settings on the image service are not used. This includes settings such as the transmission compression, resampling method, and mosaic method. To define the default settings, save a layer referencing the image service that contains all the properties, including those listed and others, such as defining a query. You can create a layer using the Make Image Server Layer tool. Once you have a layer, you can add it to the mosaic dataset using the Image Service raster type.

WMS

When adding a WMS service to a mosaic dataset, you must set one (not both) of the following in the Raster Type Properties dialog box on the WMS tab:

  • Pixel size—Specify the smallest size of the pixel you want to derive from the WMS service. This dimension is given in the units of the WMS service's spatial reference system.
  • Rows and columns—Specify the total dimension of the WMS service in rows and columns. The default is 1,000 by 1,000.

You can also specify the image format requested from the WMS service and used by the mosaic dataset. The options are JPEG, PNG, PNG24, and PNG32.

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