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LocationAllocation input data types

The input data types that can be specified when performing a location-allocation analysis are described below.

Facilities

Specify one or more facilities that the solver can use during the analysis. The solver identifies the best facilities to allocate demand to in the most efficient way according to the problem type and criteria you specify.

The data type supports the following fields:

FieldDescriptionData type

Name

The name of the facility. The name is included in the name of output allocation lines if the facility is part of the solution.

String

FacilityType

Specifies whether the facility is a candidate, required, or competitor facility. The field value is specified as one of the following integers (use the numeric code, not the name in parentheses):

  • 0 (Candidate)—A facility that may be part of the solution.
  • 1 (Required)—A facility that must be part of the solution.
  • 2 (Competitor)—A rival facility that potentially removes demand from your facilities. Competitor facilities are specific to the Maximize Market Share and Target Market Share problem types; they are ignored in other problem types.

Short

Weight

The relative weighting of the facility, which is used to rate the attractiveness, desirability, or bias of one facility compared to another.

For example, a value of 2.0 could capture the preference of customers who prefer, at a ratio of 2 to 1, shopping in one facility over another facility. Factors that potentially affect facility weight include square footage, neighborhood, and age of the building. Weight values other than one are only honored by the maximize market share and target market share problem types; they are ignored in other problem types.

Double

Capacity

The Capacity field is specific to the Maximize Capacitated Coverage problem type; the other problem types ignore this field.

Capacity specifies how much weighted demand the facility is capable of supplying. Excess demand won't be allocated to a facility even if that demand is within the facility's default measurement cutoff.

Any value assigned to the Capacity field overrides the overall default set for the analysis using the defaultCapacity property of the analysis object.

Double

CurbApproach

Specifies the direction a vehicle may arrive at or depart from the facility. The field value is specified as one of the following integers (use the numeric code, not the name in parentheses):

  • 0 (Either side of vehicle)—The facility can be visited from either the right or left side of the vehicle.
  • 1 (Right side of vehicle)—Arrive at or depart the facility so it is on the right side of the vehicle. This is typically used for vehicles such as buses that must arrive with the bus stop on the right-hand side so passengers can disembark at the curb.
  • 2 (Left side of vehicle)—Arrive at or depart the facility so it is on the left side of the vehicle. When the vehicle approaches and departs the facility, the curb must be on the left side of the vehicle. This is typically used for vehicles such as buses that must arrive with the bus stop on the left-hand side so passengers can disembark at the curb.

The CurbApproach property is designed to work with both kinds of national driving standards: right-hand traffic (United States) and left-hand traffic (United Kingdom). First, consider a facility on the left side of a vehicle. It is always on the left side regardless of whether the vehicle travels on the left or right half of the road. What may change with national driving standards is your decision to approach a facility from one of two directions, that is, so it ends up on the right or left side of the vehicle. For example, if you want to arrive at a facility and not have a lane of traffic between the vehicle and the incident, you would choose Right side of vehicle (1) in the United States but Left side of vehicle (2) in the United Kingdom.

Short Integer

Bearing

The direction in which a point is moving. The units are degrees and are measured clockwise from true north. This field is used in conjunction with the BearingTol field.

Bearing data is usually sent automatically from a mobile device equipped with a GPS receiver. Try to include bearing data if you are loading an input location that is moving, such as a pedestrian or a vehicle.

Using this field tends to prevent adding locations to the wrong edges, which can occur when a vehicle is near an intersection or an overpass for example. Bearing also helps the tool determine on which side of the street the point is.

For more information, see Bearing and BearingTol in the ArcGIS help system.

Double

BearingTol

The bearing tolerance value creates a range of acceptable bearing values when locating moving points on an edge using the Bearing field. If the value from the Bearing field is within the range of acceptable values that are generated from the bearing tolerance on an edge, the point can be added as a network location there; otherwise, the closest point on the next-nearest edge is evaluated.

The units are in degrees, and the default value is 30. Values must be greater than zero and less than 180. A value of 30 means that when Network Analyst attempts to add a network location on an edge, a range of acceptable bearing values is generated 15 degrees to either side of the edge (left and right) and in both digitized directions of the edge.

For more information, see Bearing and BearingTol in the ArcGIS help system.

Double

NavLatency

This field is only used in the solve process if Bearing and BearingTol also have values; however, entering a NavLatency value is optional, even when values are present in Bearing and BearingTol. NavLatency indicates how much time is expected to elapse from the moment GPS information is sent from a moving vehicle to a server and the moment the processed route is received by the vehicle's navigation device.

The time units of NavLatency are the same as the units specified by the timeUnits property of the analysis object.

Double

Demand point

Specify one or more demand points. The solver identifies the best facilities based in large part on how they serve the demand points specified here.

A demand point is typically a location that represents the people or things requiring the goods and services your facilities provide. A demand point could be a ZIP Code centroid weighted by the number of people residing within it or by the expected consumption generated by those people. Demand points could also represent business customers. If you supply businesses with a high turnover of inventory, they would be weighted more heavily than those with a low turnover rate.

The data type supports the following fields:

FieldDescriptionData type

Name

The name of the demand point. The name is included in the name of an output allocation line or lines if the demand point is part of the solution.

String

GroupName

The name of the group the demand point is part of. This property is ignored for the maximize capacitated coverage, target market share, and maximize market share problem types.

If demand points share a group name, the solver allocates all members of the group to the same facility. (If constraints, such as a cutoff distance, prevent any of the demand points in the group from reaching the same facility, none of the demand points are allocated.)

String

Weight

The relative weighting of the demand point. A value of 2.0 means the demand point is twice as important as one with a weight of 1.0. If demand points represent households, for example, weight could indicate the number of people in each household.

Double

Cutoff

The impedance value at which to stop searching for demand points from a given facility. The demand point can't be allocated to a facility that is beyond the value indicated here.

This attribute allows you to specify a cutoff value for each demand point. For example, you may find that people in rural areas are willing to travel up to 10 miles to reach a facility, while those in urban areas are only willing to travel up to 2 miles. You can model this behavior by setting the Cutoff value for all demand points that are in rural areas to 10 and setting the Cutoff value of the demand points in urban areas to 2.

A value for this attribute overrides the default set for the analysis using the defaultImpedanceCutoff property.

If the travel mode set for the analysis uses a time-based impedance attribute, the values are interpreted to be in the units specified by the timeUnits property. If the travel mode set for the analysis uses a distance-based impedance attribute, the values are interpreted to be in the units specified by the distanceUnits property. If the travel mode set for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is neither time based nor distance based, the values are interpreted to be in unknown units.

The default value is Null, which results in using the default value set by the defaultImpedanceCutoff property for all the demand points.

Double

ImpedanceTransformation

Allows you to override the default value set for the analysis by the decayFunctionType property of the analysis object.

Long

ImpedanceParameter

Allows you to override the default value set for the analysis by the decayFunctionParameterValue property of the analysis object.

Double

CurbApproach

Specifies the direction a vehicle may arrive at or depart from the demand point. The field value is specified as one of the following integers (use the numeric code, not the name in parentheses):

  • 0 (Either side of vehicle)—The demand point can be visited from either the right or left side of the vehicle.
  • 1 (Right side of vehicle)—Arrive at or depart the demand point so it is on the right side of the vehicle. This is typically used for vehicles such as buses that must arrive with the bus stop on the right-hand side so passengers can disembark at the curb.
  • 2 (Left side of vehicle)—Arrive at or depart the demand point so it is on the left side of the vehicle. When the vehicle approaches and departs the demand point, the curb must be on the left side of the vehicle. This is typically used for vehicles such as buses that must arrive with the bus stop on the left-hand side so passengers can disembark at the curb.

The CurbApproach property is designed to work with both kinds of national driving standards: right-hand traffic (United States) and left-hand traffic (United Kingdom). First, consider a demand point on the left side of a vehicle. It is always on the left side regardless of whether the vehicle travels on the left or right half of the road. What may change with national driving standards is your decision to approach a demand point from one of two directions, that is, so it ends up on the right or left side of the vehicle. For example, if you want to arrive at a demand point and not have a lane of traffic between the vehicle and the demand point, you would choose Right side of vehicle (1) in the United States but Left side of vehicle (2) in the United Kingdom.

Integer

Bearing

The direction in which a point is moving. The units are degrees and are measured clockwise from true north. This field is used in conjunction with the BearingTol field.

Bearing data is usually sent automatically from a mobile device equipped with a GPS receiver. Try to include bearing data if you are loading an input location that is moving, such as a pedestrian or a vehicle.

Using this field tends to prevent adding locations to the wrong edges, which can occur when a vehicle is near an intersection or an overpass for example. Bearing also helps the tool determine on which side of the street the point is.

For more information, see Bearing and BearingTol in the ArcGIS help system.

Double

BearingTol

The bearing tolerance value creates a range of acceptable bearing values when locating moving points on an edge using the Bearing field. If the value from the Bearing field is within the range of acceptable values that are generated from the bearing tolerance on an edge, the point can be added as a network location there; otherwise, the closest point on the next-nearest edge is evaluated.

The units are in degrees, and the default value is 30. Values must be greater than zero and less than 180. A value of 30 means that when Network Analyst attempts to add a network location on an edge, a range of acceptable bearing values is generated 15 degrees to either side of the edge (left and right) and in both digitized directions of the edge.

For more information, see Bearing and BearingTol in the ArcGIS help system.

Double

NavLatency

This field is only used in the solve process if Bearing and BearingTol also have values; however, entering a NavLatency value is optional, even when values are present in Bearing and BearingTol. NavLatency indicates how much time is expected to elapse from the moment GPS information is sent from a moving vehicle to a server and the moment the processed route is received by the vehicle's navigation device.

The time units of NavLatency are the same as the units specified by the timeUnits property of the analysis object.

Double

Point barrier

Specify one or more points to act as temporary restrictions or represent additional time or distance that may be required to travel on the underlying streets. For example, a point barrier can be used to represent a fallen tree along a street or a time delay spent at a railroad crossing.

The data type supports the following fields:

FieldDescriptionData type

Name

The name of the barrier.

String

BarrierType

Specifies whether the point barrier restricts travel completely or adds a cost (such as time or distance) when it is crossed. The value for this attribute is specified as one of the following integers (use the numeric code, not the name in parentheses):

  • 0 (Restriction)—Prohibits travel through the barrier. The barrier is referred to as a restriction point barrier since it acts as a restriction.
  • 2 (Added Cost)—Traveling through the barrier increases the cost (such as travel time or distance) by the amount specified in the Additional_Time, Additional_Distance, or AdditionalCost field. This barrier type is referred to as an added-cost point barrier.

Short

Additional_Time

Indicates how much travel time is added when the barrier is traversed. This field is applicable only for added-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is time based.

This field value must be greater than or equal to zero, and the values are interpreted to be in the units specified by the timeUnits property.

Double

Additional_Distance

Indicates how much distance is added when the barrier is traversed. This field is applicable only for added-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is distance based.

This field value must be greater than or equal to zero, and the values are interpreted to be in the units specified by the distanceUnits property.

Double

AdditionalCost

Indicates how much cost is added when the barrier is traversed. This field is applicable only for added-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is neither time based nor distance based.

This field value must be greater than or equal to zero, and the values are interpreted to be in unknown units.

Double

FullEdge

Specifies how the restriction point barriers are applied to the edge elements during the analysis. The field value is specified as one of the following integers (use the numeric code, not the name in parentheses):

  • 0 (False)—Permits travel on the edge up to the barrier, but not through it. This is the default value.
  • 1 (True)—Restricts travel anywhere on the associated edge.

Short

CurbApproach

Specifies the direction of traffic that is affected by the barrier. The field value is specified as one of the following integers (use the numeric code, not the name in parentheses):

  • 0 (Either side of vehicle)—The barrier affects travel over the edge in both directions.
  • 1 (Right side of vehicle)—Vehicles are only affected if the barrier is on their right side during the approach. Vehicles that traverse the same edge but approach the barrier on their left side are not affected by the barrier.
  • 2 (Left side of vehicle)—Vehicles are only affected if the barrier is on their left side during the approach. Vehicles that traverse the same edge but approach the barrier on their right side are not affected by the barrier.

Since junctions are points and don't have a side, barriers on junctions affect all vehicles regardless of the curb approach.

Short

Bearing

The direction in which a point is moving. The units are degrees and are measured clockwise from true north. This field is used in conjunction with the BearingTol field.

Bearing data is usually sent automatically from a mobile device equipped with a GPS receiver. Try to include bearing data if you are loading an input location that is moving, such as a pedestrian or a vehicle.

Using this field tends to prevent adding locations to the wrong edges, which can occur when a vehicle is near an intersection or an overpass for example. Bearing also helps the tool determine on which side of the street the point is.

For more information, see Bearing and BearingTol in the ArcGIS help system.

Double

BearingTol

The bearing tolerance value creates a range of acceptable bearing values when locating moving points on an edge using the Bearing field. If the value from the Bearing field is within the range of acceptable values that are generated from the bearing tolerance on an edge, the point can be added as a network location there; otherwise, the closest point on the next-nearest edge is evaluated.

The units are in degrees and the default value is 30. Values must be greater than zero and less than 180. A value of 30 means that when ArcGIS Network Analyst extension attempts to add a network location on an edge, a range of acceptable bearing values is generated 15 degrees to either side of the edge (left and right) and in both digitized directions of the edge.

For more information, see Bearing and BearingTol in the ArcGIS help system.

Double

NavLatency

This field is only used in the solve process if Bearing and BearingTol also have values; however, entering a NavLatency value is optional, even when values are present in Bearing and BearingTol. NavLatency indicates how much time is expected to elapse from the moment GPS information is sent from a moving vehicle to a server and the moment the processed route is received by the vehicle's navigation device.

The time units of NavLatency are the same as the units specified by the timeUnits property of the analysis object.

Double

Line barrier

Specify one or more lines that prohibit travel anywhere the lines intersect the streets. For example, a parade or protest that blocks traffic across several street segments can be modeled with a line barrier. A line barrier can also block several roads from being traversed, thereby channeling possible routes away from undesirable parts of the street network.

The data type supports the following fields:

FieldDescriptionData type

Name

The name of the barrier.

String

BarrierType

Specifies whether the barrier restricts travel completely or scales the cost (such as time or distance) for traveling through it. The field value is specified as one of the following integers (use the numeric code, not the name in parentheses):

  • 0 (Restriction)—Prohibits travel anywhere the barrier intersects your transportation network. The barrier is referred to as a restriction line barrier.
  • 1 (Scaled Cost)—Scales the cost (such as travel time or distance) required to travel the underlying streets by a factor specified using the ScaledTimeFactor, ScaledDistanceFactor, or ScaledCostFactor field. If the streets are partially covered by the barrier, the travel time or distance is apportioned and then scaled. For example, a factor of 0.25 means that travel on underlying streets is expected to be four times faster than normal. A factor of 3.0 means it is expected to take three times longer than normal to travel on underlying streets. This barrier type is referred to as a scaled-cost line barrier. It can be used to model slowdowns due to closure of traffic lanes during construction.

Short

ScaledTimeFactor

This is the factor by which the travel time of the streets intersected by the barrier is multiplied. The field value must be greater than zero.

This field is applicable only for scaled-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is time based.

Double

ScaledDistanceFactor

This is the factor by which the distance of the streets intersected by the barrier is multiplied. The field value must be greater than zero.

This field is applicable only for scaled-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is distance based.

Double

ScaledCostFactor

This is the factor by which the cost of the streets intersected by the barrier is multiplied. The field value must be greater than zero.

This field is applicable only for scaled-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is neither time based nor distance based.

Double

Polygon barrier

Specify polygons that either completely restrict travel or proportionately scale the time or distance required to travel on the streets intersected by the polygons.

The data type supports the following fields:

FieldDescriptionData type

Name

The name of the barrier.

String

BarrierType

Specifies whether the barrier restricts travel completely or scales the cost (such as time or distance) for traveling through it. The field value is specified as one of the following integers (use the numeric code, not the name in parentheses):

  • 0 (Restriction)—Prohibits traveling through any part of the barrier. The barrier is referred to as a restriction polygon barrier since it prohibits traveling on streets intersected by the barrier. One use of this type of barrier is to model floods covering areas of the street that make traveling on those streets impossible.
  • 1 (Scaled Cost)—Scales the cost (such as travel time or distance) required to travel the underlying streets by a factor specified using the ScaledTimeFactor, ScaledDistanceFactor, or ScaledCostFactor field. If the streets are partially covered by the barrier, the travel time or distance is apportioned and then scaled. For example, a factor of 0.25 means that travel on underlying streets is expected to be four times faster than normal. A factor of 3.0 means that it is expected to take three times longer than normal to travel on underlying streets. This barrier type is referred to as a scaled-cost polygon barrier. It can be used to model storms that reduce travel speeds in specific regions for example.

Short

ScaledTimeFactor

This is the factor by which the travel time of the streets intersected by the barrier is multiplied. The field value must be greater than zero.

This field is applicable only for scaled-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is time based.

Double

ScaledDistanceFactor

This is the factor by which the distance of the streets intersected by the barrier is multiplied. The field value must be greater than zero.

This field is applicable only for scaled-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is distance based.

Double

ScaledCostFactor

This is the factor by which the cost of the streets intersected by the barrier is multiplied. The field value must be greater than zero.

This field is applicable only for scaled-cost barriers and only if the travel mode used for the analysis uses an impedance attribute that is neither time based nor distance based.

Double