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List of supported map projections

Map projectionExampleDescription

Adams square II

An example of the Adams square II map projection

This projection shows the world in a square. It is a conformal projection except in the four corners of the square.

Aitoff

An example of the Aitoff map projection

This compromise modified azimuthal projection takes a form of an ellipse. It is used primarily for world maps.

Albers

An example of the Albers map projection

This equal-area conic projection is best suited for land masses extending in an east-to-west orientation at midlatitudes.

Aspect-adaptive cylindrical

An example of the aspect-adaptive cylindrical map projection

This compromise map projection adjusts the parallels to the height-to-width (aspect) ratio of a canvas. The aspect ratio must be between 0.3 and 1.

Azimuthal equidistant

An example of the azimuthal equidistant map projection

The projection preserves both distance and direction from the central point. It is used primarily for hemisphere maps.

Behrmann

An example of the Behrmann map projection

This is a cylindrical equal-area projection with standard parallels at 30°.

Berghaus star

An example of the Berghaus star map projection

This interrupted projection takes a form of a star, and it is used by the Association of American Geographers (AAG) in their logo.

Bonne

An example of the Bonne map projection

This equal-area projection was historically used to map continents. Its graticule takes a form of a heart.

Cassini

An example of the Cassini map projection

This transverse cylindrical equidistant projection is appropriate for large-scale maps with predominantly north-to-south extent.

Compact Miller

An example of the Compact Miller map projection

This compromise cylindrical world map projection compresses polar areas in comparison to the Miller projection.

Craster parabolic

An example of the Craster parabolic map projection

This pseudocylindrical equal-area projection is primarily used for thematic maps of the world.

Cube

An example of the Cube map projection

This is a faceted projection consisting of six square sides that can be folded into a cube.

Cylindrical equal area

An example of the cylindrical equal area map projection

This projection maintains the relative area on a map and presents the world in a rectangle.

Double stereographic

An example of the double stereographic map projection

This azimuthal projection is conformal and used for large-scale coordinate systems in New Brunswick and the Netherlands.

Eckert I

An example of the Eckert I map projection

This compromise pseudocylindrical projection is primarily used as a novelty map.

Eckert II

An example of the Eckert II map projection

This equal area pseudocylindrical projection is primarily used as a novelty map.

Eckert III

An example of the Eckert III map projection

This is a compromise pseudocylindrical map projection for general world maps.

Eckert IV

An example of the Eckert IV map projection

This equal-area pseudocylindrical map projection is commonly used for thematic and other world maps requiring accurate areas.

Eckert V

An example of the Eckert V map projection

This is a compromise pseudocylindrical map projection for general world maps.

Eckert VI

An example of the Eckert VI map projection

This equal-area projection is used primarily for thematic world maps.

Eckert-Greifendorff

An example of the Eckert-Greifendorff map projection

This equal-area projection is a modification of the Lambert azimuthal equal-area projection.

Equal Earth

An example of the Equal Earth map projection

This equal-area pseudocylindrical projection has a pleasing appearance for land features and is used for thematic world maps.

Equidistant conic

An example of the Equidistant conic map projection

This conic projection preserves distances along all meridians and two standard parallels and is best suited for areas extending east to west at midlatitudes.

Equidistant cylindrical

An example of the equidistant cylindrical map projection

This projection forms a grid of equal rectangles. It is also known as equirectangular, simple cylindrical, rectangular, or plate carrée.

Fuller

An example of the Fuller map projection

This projection is an unfolded 20-sided icosahedron that keeps the land masses unbroken.

Gall's stereographic

An example of the Gall's stereographic map projection

This compromise cylindrical map projection has two standard parallels at latitudes 45° north and 45° south and exaggerates polar regions.

Gauss-Krüger

An example of the Gauss-Krüger map projection

This projection is known as the ellipsoidal version of the transverse Mercator projection. It is a conformal projection that does not maintain true direction and is appropriate for mapping large-scale or smaller areas.

Geostationary satellite

An example of the geostationary satellite map projection

This projection is used by geostationary satellites that are returning data located by the satellites' scanning angles.

Gnomonic

An example of the gnomonic map projection

This azimuthal projection uses the center of the earth as its perspective point. It projects great circles as straight lines.

Goode homolosine

An example of the Goode homolosine map projection

This equal-area pseudocylindrical projection is combination of Mollweide and sinusoidal projections, most commonly used in interrupted form.

Hammer

An example of the Hammer map projection

This projection is a modification of the Lambert azimuthal equal-area projection. It is also known as the Hammer-Aitoff.

Hotine oblique Mercator

An example of the Hotine oblique Mercator map projection

This is an oblique Mercator projection developed by Martin Hotine. It is used for conformal mapping of areas that do not follow a north-south or east-west orientation but are obliquely oriented.

IGAC plano cartesiano

An example of the IGAC plano cartesiano map projection

This projection is used for urban maps in Colombia. This projection only supports very large scales.

Krovak

An example of the Krovak map projection

This is an oblique Lambert conformal conic projection designed for the former Czechoslovakia. It is used for areas that do not follow a north-south or east-west orientation but are obliquely oriented.

Laborde oblique Mercator

An example of the Laborde oblique Mercator map projection

This is an oblique Mercator projection developed by Jean Laborde. It is used for conformal mapping of areas that do not follow a north-south or east-west orientation but are obliquely oriented.

Lambert azimuthal equal-area

An example of the Lambert azimuthal equal-area map projection

This projection preserves land features at their true relative sizes. It is best suited for thematic hemisphere maps and thematic maps of polar regions.

Lambert conformal conic

An example of the Lambert conformal conic map projection

This conformal conic projection is best suited for land masses extending in an east-to-west orientation at midlatitudes.

Local

An example of the local map projection

This is a specialized map projection that does not take into account the curvature of the earth and can be used for local coordinate systems at very large scales.

Loximuthal

An example of the Loximuthal map projection

This projection shows loxodromes, or rhumb lines, as straight lines with the correct azimuth and scale from the intersection of the central meridian and the central parallel.

McBryde-Thomas flat-polar quartic

An example of the McBryde-Thomas flat-polar quartic map projection

This equal-area projection is used primarily for thematic world maps.

Mercator

An example of the Mercator map projection

This is a conformal cylindrical projection, originally created to display accurate compass bearings for sea travel. An additional feature of this projection is that all local shapes and angles are true at infinitesimal scale.

Miller cylindrical

An example of the Miller cylindrical map projection

This is similar to the Mercator projection except that the polar regions are not as greatly distorted.

Mollweide

An example of the Mollweide map projection

This equal-area pseudocylindrical projection displays the world in the form of an ellipse with axes in a 2:1 ratio. This projection can be used for thematic small-scale maps.

Natural Earth

An example of the Natural Earth map projection

This is a compromise pseudocylindrical map projection for world maps. It was specifically designed for displaying physical data.

Natural Earth II

An example of the Natural Earth II map projection

This is a compromise pseudocylindrical map projection for world maps with distinguished meridians, which bend steeply toward the poles.

New Zealand National Grid

An example of the New Zealand National Grid map projection

This is the standard projection for large-scale maps of New Zealand.

Ney modified conic

An example of the Ney modified conic projection

Ney is a modified Lambert conformal conic projection used to map areas near the poles.

Orthographic

An example of the Orthographic map projection

This perspective projection views the globe from an infinite distance. This gives the illusion of a three-dimensional globe.

Patterson

An example of the Patterson map projection

This is a compromise cylindrical map projection designed by Tom Patterson in 2014.

Peirce quincuncial

An example of the Peirce quincuncial map projection

This projection shows the world in a square. It is a conformal projection except in the middle of the four sides of the square.

Plate carrée

An example of the Plate carrée map projection

This projection is simple to construct because it forms a grid of equal squares. This projection is often used to display data in a geographic coordinate system.

Polyconic

An example of the polyconic map projection

The name of this projection translates into "many cones" and refers to the projection methodology.

Quartic authalic

An example of the quartic authalic map projection

This pseudocylindrical equal-area projection is primarily used for thematic maps of the world.

Rectified skewed orthomorphic

An example of the rectified skewed orthomorphic map projection

This is an oblique Mercator projection developed by Martin Hotine. It is used for conformal mapping of areas that do not follow a north-south or east-west orientation but are obliquely oriented. Used in Malaysia and Brunei.

Robinson

An example of the Robinson map projection

This is a compromise projection used for world maps.

Sinusoidal

An example of the sinusoidal map projection

This pseudocylindrical equal-area projection displays all parallels and the central meridian at true scale.

Stereographic

An example of the stereographic map projection

This azimuthal projection is conformal.

Times

An example of the Times map projection

This compromise pseudocylindrical map projection is a modified Gall stereographic but with curved meridians.

Tobler cylindrical I

An example of the Tobler cylindrical I map projection

This projection is a compromise cylindrical map projection developed and introduced by Waldo Tobler in 1997 as his first simpler alternative to the Miller cylindrical projection.

Tobler cylindrical II

An example of the Tobler cylindrical II map projection

This projection is a compromise cylindrical map projection developed and introduced by Waldo Tobler in 1997 as his second simpler alternative to the Miller cylindrical projection.

Transverse cylindrical equal-area

An example of the transverse cylindrical equal-area map projection

This projection is a transverse aspect of the cylindrical equal-area. This projection is appropriate for maps with a predominantly north-to-south extent.

Transverse Mercator

An example of the transverse Mercator map projection

This is similar to the Mercator projection except that the cylinder is tangent along a meridian instead of the equator. The result is a conformal projection that does not maintain true direction and is appropriate for mapping large-scale or smaller areas.

Two-point equidistant

An example of the two-point equidistant map projection

This modified azimuthal projection shows the true distance from either of two focal points to any other point on a map.

Van der Grinten I

An example of the Van der Grinten I map projection

This compromise polyconic projection shows the world in a circle.

Vertical near-side perspective

An example of the vertical near-side perspective map projection

Unlike the orthographic projection, this perspective projection views the globe from a finite distance. This perspective gives the overall effect of the view from a satellite.

Wagner IV

An example of the Wagner IV map projection

This pseudocylindrical equal-area projection is used primarily for thematic world maps.

Wagner V

An example of the Wagner V map projection

This pseudocylindrical compromise projection is used primarily for world maps.

Wagner VII

An example of the Wagner VII map projection

This equal-area projection is a modification of the Lambert azimuthal equal-area projection. It is also known as Hammer-Wagner projection. The projection is primarily used for world thematic maps.

Winkel I

An example of the Winkel I map projection

This is a pseudocylindrical projection that averages the coordinates from the equidistant cylindrical and sinusoidal projections.

Winkel II

An example of the Winkel II map projection

This is a pseudocylindrical projection that averages the coordinates from the equidistant cylindrical and Mollweide projections.

Winkel Tripel

An example of the Winkel Tripel map projection

This is a compromise projection used for world maps that averages the coordinates from the equidistant cylindrical and Aitoff projections. This projection is used by the National Geographic Society for general world maps.

This table lists all the currently supported map projections in ArcGIS Pro. Click the name of the map projection to get more information.