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Author and share a map

Tutorial summary

With ArcGIS Pro, you can share your maps as web maps to your active portal. A web map is an interactive display of geographic information you can use to tell stories and answer questions. Web maps are composed of web layers. In ArcGIS Pro, you can author your map with existing web layers or with data layers that are shared as web layers when you share your web map. Web maps can be opened in ArcGIS Pro as well as in standard web browsers.

This tutorial will guide you through the process of authoring a map and sharing it to ArcGIS Online.

Estimated time

30 minutes

Software requirements

  • ArcGIS Pro

    ArcGIS Pro 2.2 is recommended; however, the tutorial project file will open in earlier versions of ArcGIS Pro.

  • ArcGIS Online or ArcGIS Enterprise
    • Publisher role or equivalent
  • Internet connection

If you don't have ArcGIS Pro or ArcGIS Online, you can sign up for an ArcGIS free trial .

Find and open the project

This tutorial uses feature layers from Esri Maps and Data. You will examine data in New York City using the USA Households by Census Block and USA Population by ZIP Code layers. For this tutorial, the original data has been clipped to only include features from Manhattan Island in the state of New York.

The map and associated layers for the tutorial are contained in a package (.ppkx) file. This is a compressed file that contains GIS data and can be shared in the same way as any other file: through email or FTP site, or via ArcGIS Online or a portal.

  1. Start ArcGIS Pro and sign in if necessary.
  2. On the start page, under your recent projects, click Open another project.
    Note:

    If you already have a project open, click the Project tab on the ribbon to open a different project.

  3. On the Open project page, click Portal and click Browse Browse.
  4. On the Open Project dialog box, under Portal Portal, click All Portal All Portal.
  5. At the top of the dialog box, in the Search box, type New York City PPKX and press Enter.
  6. In the list of search results, click New York City to select the project package.
    Note:

    If there is more than one project package with this name, look at the Owner column. Select the item with the owner name ArcGISProTutorials.

    If you don't get any search results, see Access the quick-start tutorials for help.

  7. Click OK.
    Manhattan Island map

    The package downloads and the project opens with the Manhattan Island map. It shows households by census block displayed as points and population by ZIP Code as polygons.

    The project is stored in your <user documents>\ArcGIS\Packages folder.

    You'll make three changes to the map before you share it:

    • You'll change the basemap.
    • You'll symbolize the Households by Census Block layer as a heat map to show the density of households.
    • You'll copy the Population by ZIP Code layer and symbolize it by population density.

Change the basemap

Any bookmarks you author for your map in ArcGIS Pro are maintained when your map is shared as a web map. If you created your bookmark in a projection that doesn't match your basemap, the bookmark may not work as expected in different client applications, such as Map Viewer. For best performance, create all bookmarks in the projection of your basemap. For more information, see Bookmarks.

The basemap provides geographic context for the operational layers on the map. You'll use the Light Gray Canvas basemap to get a better view of the features in Manhattan.

  1. On the Map tab, in the Layer group, click Basemap Basemap and click Light Gray Canvas.

    The Topographic basemap is replaced by the Light Gray Canvas basemap.

  2. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button Save to save the project.

Symbolize households with a heat map

You can see from the dark blue symbols around Central Park in midtown Manhattan that this area contains large numbers of households. However, the symbology makes it difficult to interpret the data when the map is zoomed to the scale of Manhattan. You'll symbolize the number of households with a heat map instead.

  1. In the Contents pane, click the Households by Census Block layer to select it.

    Contextual tabs for working with the layer appear on the ribbon.

  2. On the ribbon, under Feature Layer, click the Appearance tab. In the Drawing group, click Symbology Symbology.
  3. In the Symbology pane, under Primary Symbology, click the drop-down arrow and click Heat Map.

    The map updates to show a heat map of the layer. By default, the heat map represents the density of feature locations: it shows you that there are a lot of census blocks in lower Manhattan, which is not what you want to see. Each census block contains a different number of households, and it is the distribution of this attribute—the pattern of relatively many and relatively few households—that you want to show. To do this, you need to set Weight field to the Households field in the layer attribute table.

  4. In the Symbology pane, click the Weight field drop-down arrow and click Households.
  5. Click the Color Scheme drop-down arrow and check the Show Names check box at the bottom.
  6. Click the Heat Map 4 - Semitransparent color scheme.
    Heat map of households

    The map shows a high concentration of households east of Central Park, symbolized by the white area of the heat map. A second concentration is south of the park in Greenwich Village. While these areas have many households, they do not necessarily have the highest population density because the number of people per household may be small.

    Note:

    The semitransparency in the color scheme name refers to the way the boundaries of the heat map are rendered, not to your ability to see through the layer.

  7. Zoom in and out on the map.

    The heat map symbology is dynamic and updates to show areas of relative concentration as you zoom to different scales.

  8. On the ribbon, click the Map tab. In the Navigate group, click Bookmarks Bookmarks and click Manhattan Island.
  9. In the Contents pane, turn off the Households by Census Block layer.

Symbolize population density

The Population by ZIP Code layer uses a graduated color scheme to symbolize 2013 population. You can see on the map that many people live on the west side and on the lower east side. However, ZIP Codes are not uniform in size, so the map does not represent density (the number of people per square unit of area). However, the attribute table for the layer has a field with population density values. You'll copy the layer in the map and symbolize it by population density.

  1. In the Contents pane, right-click the Population by ZIP Code layer and click Copy Copy.
  2. In the Contents pane, right-click the Manhattan Island map name and click Paste Paste.

    A copy of the layer, with the same name and symbology, is pasted at the top of the Contents pane.

  3. Right-click the copied layer name and click Properties Properties.
  4. On the Layer Properties dialog box, on the General page, change the Name to Population Density by ZIP Code. Click OK.
  5. In the Contents pane, drag the Population Density by ZIP Code layer below the Households by Census Block layer.

    As you drag the layer, its position in the Contents pane is represented by a horizontal gray line.

  6. Turn off the Population by ZIP Code layer.
    Note:

    The ZIP Code layers are partially transparent—if you leave both turned on, their symbology will blend together.

  7. Right-click the Population Density by ZIP Code layer and click Symbology Symbology.
  8. In the Symbology pane, click the Field drop-down arrow and click Population 2013 by Sq Mile.

    The classification method defaults to Natural Breaks (Jenks). The color scheme doesn't change, but the values and labels at the bottom of the pane update to reflect the values in the specified field.

  9. Click the Color scheme drop-down arrow. Scroll through the color schemes and click Purple-Blue-Green (6 classes). (The list is alphabetical.)

    On the map, the layer is drawn with the new method and color scheme. The Natural Breaks (Jenks) method uses value clusters in the data to determine class breaks. Although this is often a useful way to symbolize your data, the break values themselves are usually not round numbers and the value ranges may be quite different from one class to another. You'll switch to a method that groups the values into equal ranges and makes the legend easy to interpret.

  10. In the Symbology pane, click the Method drop-down arrow and click Defined Interval.
  11. In the Interval size box, replace the default value with 25000 and press Enter.

    In the Contents pane, the ZIP Codes are now classified by equal value ranges. Features with a population density less than 25,000 people per square mile have the lightest color. Features with a density between 125,000 and 150,000 people per square mile have the darkest color. (Manhattan is one of the most densely populated areas in the world.) The map features reflect the new classification.

    Population density map of Manhattan
  12. In the Contents pane, toggle the two ZIP Code population layers on and off to compare them.

    The most populous ZIP Codes are mostly on the west side of Manhattan, but the most densely populated ones are on the east side.

  13. When you're finished, turn on the Population Density by ZIP Code layer and turn off the Population by ZIP Code layer.
  14. Close the Symbology pane.
  15. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save Save to save the project.

Configure pop-ups

Pop-ups provide a quick view of a feature's attributes and can include charts and images. You'll configure the pop-ups for the Population Density by ZIP Code layer to display a bar chart comparing densities for 2010 and 2013.

  1. Click a ZIP Code feature on the map.

    A pop-up shows the ZIP Code number, the 2010 and 2013 populations—not population densities—and a demographic pie chart. The pop-up was copied from the Population by ZIP Code layer, so you need to change its configuration.

  2. Close the pop-up.
  3. In the Contents pane, click the Population Density by ZIP Code layer to select it.
  4. Right-click the layer and click Configure Pop-ups Configure pop-ups.
  5. In the Pop-ups pane, next to Fields(3), click Edit pop-up element Edit pop-up element to display Fields Options.

    Under Fields Options, you can see that only three of the fifty or so fields from the attribute table are checked to display in the pop-up.

  6. Uncheck the Display check boxes for the following fields:
    • Population 2010
    • Population 2013
  7. Check the Display check boxes for the following fields:
    • Population 2010 per Sq Mile
    • Population 2013 by Sq Mile
  8. Click the Back button Back to return to the main Pop-ups pane.
  9. Next to Chart of population by race/ethnicity, click Edit pop-up element Edit pop-up element to display Chart Options.
  10. At the top of the pane, click Column Chart Column Chart.
  11. In the Title box, replace the current title with Change in population density.
  12. Uncheck the Display check boxes for the following fields:
    • White
    • Black
    • Asian
    • Hispanic
  13. Check the Display check boxes for the following fields:
    • Population 2010 per Sq Mile
    • Population 2013 by Sq Mile

    Chart Options in Pop-ups pane

  14. Click the Back button Back.
  15. Click a ZIP Code feature on the map to see its pop-up.
    Pop-up

    The pop-up now shows the population density values for 2010 and 2013 and a bar chart comparing them.

  16. Click a few more features to see their pop-ups. When you're finished, close the open pop-up.
  17. Close the Pop-ups pane.
  18. In the Contents pane, turn on the Households by Census Block layer and the Population by ZIP Code layer.
  19. On the Map tab, in the Navigate group, click Bookmarks Bookmarks and click Manhattan Island.
  20. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save Save.

Prepare the map for sharing

You're ready to configure and analyze the map in preparation for sharing it to ArcGIS Online.

  1. On the ribbon, click the Share tab. In the Share As group, click Web Map Web Map.

    The Share As Web Map pane opens with the Map tab selected at the top of the pane.

  2. In the Share As Web Map pane, accept the default name Manhattan Island or change it to a name you prefer.
    Note:

    The name can't include spaces. Also, you can't have duplicate names for published items in your ArcGIS Online organization. You may want to add your name or initials to the map name to make sure it's unique in your organization.

  3. Under Item Description, for Summary, type Manhattan population data for query and analysis.

    The summary briefly describes the purpose or content of the map. It's displayed as part of the item details in ArcGIS Online.

  4. For Tags, type population, population density, ZIP Codes, Manhattan, New York. Press Enter.

    Tags help people find the map. Tags are separated by a comma or semicolon.

  5. Under Sharing with, check additional check boxes if you want to share the map with others in your organization or with everyone.
    Note:

    If My Content is the only checked box, no one except you and your organization administrator can see the map. If your organization's box is checked, all members of your organization can see the map. If Everyone is checked, anyone connected to the Internet can see the map. (A person's ability to interact with the map will be limited unless they have an ArcGIS account.) If you belong to any groups, you will have the option to share the map with those groups as well.

  6. Under Select a Configuration, confirm that the drop-down list is set to Copy all data: Exploratory.

    Copying the data will allow users to query and interact with the data, but not edit it, in ArcGIS Online.

    Share As Web Map pane

  7. At the top of the Share As Web Map pane, click the Configuration tab.
    Configuration tab of Share As Web Map pane

    On the Configuration tab, you see the items that will be created in your My Content folder in ArcGIS Online. There will be a web map and a web feature layer (WFL). The web feature layer will be a group layer composed of the three population layers in your map.

    Before sharing the map, you'll analyze it. The analysis process identifies potential performance bottlenecks and errors that need to be addressed.

  8. At the bottom of the pane, click Analyze.

    You'll see a warning that the Households by Census Block layer does not have a feature template set. Warnings do not prevent publishing. You can ignore this warning because a default feature template will be created for you automatically.

    Tip:

    Double-click the warning to learn more about it.

Share the map and view the results

The map is now ready to share.

  1. At the bottom of the Share As Web Map pane, click Share.

    The sharing process may take some time. When the map is ready, you'll see a green message at the bottom of the Share As Web Map pane. The message includes a link to manage the web map.

  2. On the Successfully shared web map message, click Manage the web map.

    A web browser opens to the ArcGIS Online sign-in page.

  3. Enter your user name and password and click Sign In.

    You are taken to your web map's item details page.

  4. In the upper right corner of the page, click Open in Map Viewer.

    The heat map symbology may not look just how you expected, but you can modify it easily.

  5. In the Contents pane of the web map, turn off the Population Density by ZIP Code and Population by ZIP Code layers.
  6. Hover over the Households by Census Block layer and click Change Style Change Style.
  7. On the Change Style pane, under Select a drawing style, on the Heat Map style, click Options.
  8. Move the Area of Influence slider all the way to the Larger end.

    The heat map should now look like it does in ArcGIS Pro.

  9. On the Change Style pane, click OK and then click Done.
    ArcGIS Online heat map
  10. In the Contents pane, toggle the layers on and off to explore them separately. Click features on the map to see their pop-ups.
    Tip:

    You can hover over the bar and pie charts in the pop-ups to see the chart values.

  11. On the web map toolbar, click Save Save and click Save.
  12. In ArcGIS Pro, close the Share As Web Map pane.
  13. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button Save.

This workflow has guided you through the process of creating and publishing a web map. During this process, you updated the basemap, changed layer symbology, configured pop-ups, analyzed the map to determine whether it was ready to publish, and finally shared it as a web map.

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